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Singapore in a Nutshell October 25, 2011

Posted by Dru in East Asia, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Singapore in a Nutshell” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-JE

Singapore is a small country that has been influenced a lot by history and outside forces.  It can be argued that Singapore was born in the early 1800s when England established a colony in the area.  It was governed by England, with a brief Japanese rule during World War II until the 1960s when Britain allowed Singapore to merge with other countries to form Malaysia.  This lasted only 2 years before it was made completely independent.  It has since flourished and grown as a distinct country on the southern tip of Malaysia.  Singapore is a very small country that can be related more as a city than a country.  It is well known for its crack-down on crime with stiff punishments.  Even so, Singapore is a very clean country that is very multicultural.

Singapore is well known for its airport, Changi Airport. It is touted as one of the best airports in the world, along with Seoul’s Incheon and Hong Kong.  It is a very large, magnificent, and beautiful airport with 3 terminals and lots of things to do.  It is also one of the strangest airports I have ever visited.  Upon entering, the method of entry was pretty standard, however it was more American in the fact that I exited the gate and I was in the security controlled area of the airport.  I walked past all of the duty free shops and straight to immigration where I had the typical passport check.  I then proceeded past all of the luggage belts and out the door.  There was no customs control for those who had nothing to declare and only one guard there.  They didn’t take anything such as a customs card. This was also the strangest departure of an airport in my life.  For my departure, I nearly had a typical experience.  The check-in procedure was pretty straight forward.  I had to get my GST rebate prior to checking in, but with everything prepared at the shop all I had to do was scan my barcode and that was that.  I passed through immigration control very easily and I was extremely surprised that there were no security checks to get into the controlled area.  In fact, Changi Airport only does security checks when you enter the gate area, which most people probably don’t know.  The shopping at all 3 terminals are all very similar with almost nothing to differentiate the areas aside from the fact that each building was built at different times.  The shops are all completely the same.  I probably wasted a little time going to Terminal 3 to check out a few of the shops when I didn’t have to.  I will say that the airport is one of the best I have ever visited, but an airport is still just an airport with nothing too special.

Getting into the city is very easy.  Some people take taxis which are affordable but I decided to take the train.  A word of advice; be very aware of the limits of the IC card that they use.  The EZ-Pass is very useful but the cost of it is not really worth it.  I was surprised to learn that I needed a minimum $3 to use the train system and if you top it up with $10 just before going to the airport, you still have to wait 2 or so hours before you can get a refund on the balance.  Plus, a refund means you forfeit the card, which I didn’t know at the time.  Otherwise, the IC card and the train system is very efficient.  Getting downtown, I stayed at Bugis Station, was very easy as Bugis Station is on the main line to the airport.  There are buses that you can use to get around the city but they can be a little difficult to use as you have to calculate how far you need to go.  With an IC card, there is no thinking.  Just tap and go.  It is no different than in other East Asian cities that also use IC cards.  The other plus is that downtown Singapore is such a small area that you can easily walk around the city on your own.  There is no real need to use public transportation unless you decide to head to Sentosa Island or to some of the more distant areas.

Singapore is a very multi-cultural city.  My impression that Singapore is a multi-cultural city could have been due to the Formula One Grand Prix that was happening at the time as well but from all of the workers and what appeared to be local people, I noticed a lot of different people.  While Chinese people are the largest group, I saw a large and healthy group of Malays and Indians.  This can easily be reflected in the architecture of the city.  It is easy to see Hindu temples next to Taoist temples, mosques next to churches and so on.  Many of these religious buildings are a beacon in their respective blocks as if to say that their religion is more important than the other, yet there seems to be a great respect for each other.  I can’t say that this is true in real life but that was my brief view of the city at the time.  The common language in Singapore is English, and while Chinese is the most widely spoken native language, it is not the common language.  I have heard time and time again that Chinese will be the most spoken language of the world and that we must learn it in order to survive in business.  I highly doubt that is true.  While it is true that Chinese will become the most spoken language in the world, it won’t be the common language.  People need a unifying language in order to communicate with each other and I think English will continue to be that language.  If you ever visit Singapore, you will notice this easily.  It is quite easy to notice that while speaking Chinese is an asset in communicating smoothly, Indians and Malays don’t speak Chinese or if they do it is very limited.  Even if they did speak Chinese, there are many different Chinese languages.  Hence English will continue to be the unifying language of the world and Singapore for the indefinite future.

Singapore itself is an every growing country.  You can see change everywhere you go.  It is similar to Tokyo in that respect.  Many of the older buildings are being torn down to make way for new high rises.  The central business district near the Fullerton Hotel is an expanding region.  You can find many businesses there.  You can see the huge development in the Marina Bay area with the new Marina Bay Sands hotel and the huge gardens that are being constructed behind the hotel.  The entire area is undergoing its last push for development and should be finished in the next few years.  While there are many new developments happening around Singapore, I also noticed that a lot of historical buildings are being maintained or restored.  It is wonderful to see the Raffles Hotel and how it hasn’t changed much since it was originally built.  It is great to see the old Fullerton Hotel as well as other historic buildings being maintained.  There are also various buildings that are being modernized and restored.  The Custom’s House complex was modernized while retaining the original façade.  Even the famous Arab St. looks historical while being modernized inside the buildings themselves.  It is an amazing sight to see and something I feel Japan can learn from.

Singapore is a wonderful city/country to visit.  I would love to visit this city again in the future.  While it wasn’t a perfect trip, I was impressed by everything I did and everything I saw.  It has the modernity of Japan with the historical feel of Hong Kong or Macau.  It also has a lot of unique aspects that give it its charm.  While I cannot tell whether my visit was influenced by the F1 event that was happening at the same time, I did thoroughly enjoy the visit.  In the following posts on Singapore I will go into greater detail on the different areas specifically.

Singapore in a Nutshell is part of a series of posts on Singapore.  Please continue with the links below to read more about Singapore:

2011 Grand Prix of Japan October 18, 2011

Posted by Dru in Sports.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “2011 Grand Prix of Japan” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-Jg

The 2011 Grand Prix of Japan was originally scheduled to take place in April, but due to the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, the race was promptly postponed.  It was tentatively rescheduled to October 2nd, its traditional spot on the Moto GP calendar.  In the last 3 years, the Grand Prix of Japan was scheduled to take place in March/April.  The first year was run without a problem, but the following year it was moved to October due to the volcanic eruption in Iceland.  The volcano prevented teams and some of the equipment from flying out to Japan due to safety concerns.  This year, while rescheduled to take place from September 30 to October 2, the race had been in doubt for some time.  Twin Ring Motegi Circuit is located just over 120km from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and with that distance it made the riders and a lot of their crew nervous about coming to Japan.  There were only a few people who were advocates for Japan and the loudest was, naturally, Hiroshi Aoyama.  It doesn’t hurt that he is Japanese and his feeling is that the Grand Prix would help Japan and the riders would be safe.  After Dorna, the rights holder for Moto GP, along with the FIM (Federation Internationale de Motorcyclisme) contracted an Italian University to conduct an independent survey of Motegi and the surrounding towns for radiation levels both at the track, in the soil, and the food, most of the teams started to feel safe.  Unfortunately, while the scientific study said things were safe, the riders and many of the crew were still nervous about going to Japan and up until the last few weeks prior to the race itself, there were still big questions marks over who would or wouldn’t be attending.  In the end all of the riders came to Japan but not all of the teams.  Some of the teams, two as far as I know and both in lower classes, decided to not bring their mechanics and used local mechanics instead.  The entire Moto GP tour also brought their own food and water to allay any fears they still had.  It was an interesting compromise that provided a great event.

If you read my past posts about the Moto GP events, things haven’t changed too much.  This year there was no presence by Kawasaki.  They still had a very small booth last year but that has all disappeared.  Suzuki has also significantly reduced their presence at the event with just a tiny booth that showcased a couple items for sale.  Honda was still the largest manufacturer on display with Yamaha and Ducati a close second and third.  Since I have been to this event many times, I feel as if I’m an expert in what to do when visiting these events.  I typically entered the event and just did a lot of shopping on qualifying day.  I spent more time walking around the event than before as I wanted to check out the vantage points from various places.  Saturday is a great day to check out the various grandstands as they are all open to the public.  On Sunday, the reserved seating areas are closed off to those with valid tickets so watching the warm-up or parts of the race from other locations is not allowed.  This year I decided to change my tradition.  For the last several years, I joined the Yamaha Supporters group where I would get free swag for supporting Yamaha.  My favourite racer, Valentino Rossi, had changed teams this year to ride for Ducati, so I felt I couldn’t support Yamaha completely.  I am a huge Rossi fan so I decided to return to the grandstands that I visited on my first trip to the Japan Grand Prix, the 90 Degree Corner.  The 90 Degree Corner is considered to be the most exciting place on the track to watch the race.  It is named 90 Degree Corner because it is a 90 degree right turn that follows a downhill section.  The turn is also slightly off camber making it very tricky to get around quickly and smoothly.  Many riders have run off at that corner and many have crashed.  The other main corner is corner 3 where many other accidents occur.  The main straight may have the advantage of being where other supporters are as well as the podium, but for real enthusiasts, heading to other corners can be a lot more fun.  I always enjoy trying new areas just to enjoy the racing.

This year, as mentioned, the event was under a different air.  People were their regular selves and attendance seemed to be average.  The booths were a little different as more secondary sponsors were present and some of the traditional Japanese sponsors had pulled out.  Things are slowly changing, including the food.  I noticed that while the barbecued steaks on a stick were the same, and so was the beer, I never noticed the curry rice before.  I also never noticed how difficult it was to get water at the event.  Most of the places were selling sports drinks, coke, tea, and beer.  It was difficult to find anyone selling water anywhere.  In terms of interviews and such, it was pretty standard.  Suzuki’s test rider was one of the most prominent figures doing interviews and many others were going around.  The most important people had huge crowds.  Trying to watch interviews with Jorge Lorenzo, Dani Pedrosa, or even Casey Stoner was next to impossible unless you were waiting for nearly an hour before the actual event.  I was pretty content to just enjoy the interviews from far away and just listen to them.  Most of the things they talked about were pretty standard.  “It’s good to be here.  The track is a very stop and go track.  You need a lot of horsepower and a good setup.  I hope to do well.”  You really can’t get much more out of a rider who must be very careful with their words.  One of the best characters in Moto GP has to be Colin Edwards.  I had been a fan of his since I first “met” him in a rider’s clinic in Vancouver prior to the 2005 season.  I would discover that Colin has a remarkably frank way of speaking as well as being comical.  He was pretty honest about his opinions without getting into too much trouble.  He praises the bike all the time but hits out when he knows he has troubles.  He is also very honest when it comes to his own mistakes and does what he can to improve.  Next year will see him move from the Tech 3 Yamaha team to a new team that hopes to use his skills to develop their new bike.

In terms of the race, everything was pretty standard.  I was very happy and enjoyed the first two races.  It was the last year of the 125cc class as next year they move to 250cc 4-stroke engines and calling the class Moto3.  It was a nice race and somewhat predictable.  Motegi isn’t well known for its exciting 125 races as the long straights mean the riders can stretch out a bit and get away if they are lucky.  Unfortunately that was the case and nothing much happened.  The only special event was the fact that Frenchman Johann Zarco finally won his first race in Moto GP.  He had actually crossed the finish line in first near the beginning of the season but that was cancelled as he made a dangerous move on the last lap resulting in a 20 second penalty.  A second time he crossed the line tied for first but lost the win because his fastest lap of the race was slower than the other rider.  It was the first time that he was allowed on the top step to celebrate with champagne as the winner of a race.  In Moto2, the race was more interesting.  Marc Marquez has been showing his form and has made a charge up the championship field to take over the championship lead after this race.  The race was won by Andrea Iannone who has a lot of talent but tends to make too many mistakes.  The big event is Moto GP.  It was time for the big boys to come out on to the track.  The Moto GP race was an incident filled race.  It started with a crash by Valentino Rossi in the 3rd corner of the first lap.  He ran into Jorge Lorenzo as he tried to avoid Ben Spies which causing him to crash into the sand.  He retired before he could even finish one lap.  Needless to say I was very disappointed.  Casey Stoner was leading quite well until he had a tank slapper on the back straight which caused his brake pads to move which resulted in him losing his brakes for a second and subsequently running off course and into the sand.  He did rejoin in 7th place before finishing the race in 3rd.  3 riders were given a ride through penalty for jumping the start and 2 other riders crashed before the end of the race.  The field was reduced by a large margin and the winner would eventually be Dani Pedrosa.  It had been a long time since Honda had won on home soil and Jorge Lorenzo did his best to steal the win at the end but couldn’t keep up with the dominant Dani Pedrosa.  There were some spirited passes throughout the field the entire race and it was one of the more enjoyable races I saw.  I usually get a little tired about halfway through the race in the main grandstands but this year was much better and easier at the 90 Degree Corner.  I think I found my new home unless Valentino has his own supporter’s tour that will stay in another grandstand somewhere.

I have said it many times before.  If you love motorcycles, you should watch the Grand Prix of Japan in person.  It is a very fun experience.  Racing in Japan is very similar, be it F1, WRC, or even Moto GP.  I have watched all three now and while they are all different, the feeling is similar.  The fans carry flags and wave them feverishly.  People love their heroes all the time and do their best to will them on.  Like any country, the races themselves are exciting to watch and the food can be expensive.  With the right mindset, you will have the time of your life and memories that will last a lifetime.

2011 Grand Prix of Japan is part of a series of posts recounting my trips to Twin Ring Motegi and the Japanese round of the Moto GP series.  To read my other posts about this race please follow the links below:

Information:

Moto GP Official Site:  http://www.motogp.com/

2011 Formula 1 Singtel Singapore Grand Prix October 11, 2011

Posted by Dru in Sports.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “2011 Formula 1 Singtel Singapore Grand Prix” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-Jc

For anyone who has read my blog over the years, you know that I am an avid race fan.  I have been to the Japan GP for Moto GP (motorcycles) almost every year since I’ve been in Japan.  I have also been to the F1 Grand Prix in Japan 3 times as well as Rally Japan in Hokkaido last year.  This year, I decided to take a trip to Singapore to watch the F1 race.  Singapore does not have the same history as Suzuka or even Fuji Speedway but it is quickly growing.  The location has been likened to an Asian Monaco Grand Prix due to the similarities of a road course on narrow streets.  Like Monaco, the race winds its way around historical buildings but unlike Monaco, the race also passes new modern buildings that were finished very recently, or are still being completed.  The Singapore GP has also built up a lot of entertainment for both casual and diehard fans alike.

The run up to the Singapore GP lasts roughly a week before the actual GP.  While the F1 circus probably doesn’t arrive until the Wednesday before the race, the event starts roughly 7-10 days ahead.  Many of the shopping malls start by getting their decorations up and many shops have grand prix sales.  It is an exciting time to just be in the city and you can easily feel it in the air.  I didn’t arrive in Singapore until the Thursday before the race, which gave me three and a half days to soak up the atmosphere of the race weekend.  At that time, everything was in place and things seemed to be running smoothly.  Most shops had a minimum 20% discount on items.  It was great to see and many shopping malls had outdoor shops of various F1 sponsors.  Tag Heuer had a portable shop erected outside a shopping complex in the Orchard district.  Puma had a small container ship transformed into a portable shop located near one of the main entrances to the circuit.  While walking around the various shopping malls, you would be highly likely to also run into a previous model of F1 cars on display.  I only saw three, Lotus Renault, Force India, and Ferrari.  I would assume that there were more, but I didn’t run into them and there was little to no information on where they would be.  That is the only challenge when visiting Singapore during the F1 season, some of the public locations around the city are hard to find and you just have to stumble upon them.

The actual circuit is split into 4 fan zones.  Zone 1 encompasses the main straight and grandstands as well as the paddock.  Zones 2 and 3 are located in nicer viewing areas, and Zone 4 is the general area at the far end of the track that is closer to the city.  Most of the casual fans will flock to Zone 4.  This is the largest zone with many viewing platforms, a few grandstands, and the concert venue.  The entire weekend is filled with various concerts on each day.  They set aside a large grass field and built a temporary stage at one end.  During each concert, it is nothing but a sea of people in the entire field.  In fact, I’m sure many people buy tickets just for the concerts, rather than the F1 race.  Being more of an F1 fan than a fan of the musicians, I didn’t go to any of the concerts.  By the time the race ended, I was too tired to push through all the people and barely watch a concert.  I thought that by the time I walked from Zone 1 to Zone 4, the field would be completely full and I wouldn’t be able to see anything.  Zones 2 and 3 are pretty boring to be honest with only a few entertainers roaming around.  The only difference between the two zones is the fact that Zone 2 has one of the famous grandstands facing Marina Bay itself.  These grandstands face a floating platform and the cars themselves race under the grandstands at one point.  Otherwise, both Zones 2 and 3 are almost no different to Zone 1.  Zone 1 is for the real race enthusiasts.  It is where you will find all of the people hanging out waiting for the race.  While both Zone 1 and 4 have F1 villages where you can buy merchandise, Zone 1 has better viewing platforms and it is around the most important corners in the race.  I also found that more kids and families stayed in Zone 4 than Zone 1 and a lot more F1 merchandise was carried around in Zone 1.  It was noticeable difference but not by a huge amount.

The experience of the F1 weekend is something that I can’t explain.  It is a thrilling and exciting event that must be experienced to understand.  Every day is filled with people.  The streets are filled with F1 enthusiasts just roaming around wearing their favourite team colours.  Inside the circuit area, you can see so many people.  After going to F1 at Suzuka and Fuji Speedway, I must say the level of noise in Singapore was much greater.  They had “survival kits” for $2 each that contained a poncho and earplugs.  On Friday, I was walking around and experienced just one practice session.  At first, things were okay.  My ears were fine and I thought it wasn’t bad until I headed up and crossed the track at one of the overhead passes.  The scream of the engines were deafening and I could feel it shaking every cell in my body.  I had to plug my ears just to keep them from ringing.  I went to another location located under a bridge where the sounds of the engine echoed.  It was so deafening that without plugging my ears with my hands, my ears felt as if they were starting to bleed.  It was terribly loud due to the echo, but it was extremely fun.  The other experience of the race that must be felt is how close you actually come to the track.  In regular tracks, you are in grandstands that are metres away from the track itself.  There is also a large runoff area for the driver’s safety.  In Singapore, the track is narrow and the viewing areas are usually no more than a metre or so from the track barrier.  It is exciting to see the cars miss a turn and probably more so to see them crash.  I was not in a corner where a car had crashed, but I was in a corner where the cars missed the corner a couple times.  It wasn’t bad but it wasn’t great either.

In terms of the race itself, qualifying was a bit of a disappointment for me.  I was hoping to see Kamui Kobayashi do well but he crashed out in the second round.  The race was nice and interesting and the first few laps were exciting to see cars go through the turn two by two.  I was camping out at turn 5 as I liked the position for photos.  Things seemed to be going well and there were no problems at all, from what I could see.  I heard a few things but didn’t see much as there wasn’t a TV screen nearby.  Thankfully some people had Fanvision portable TVs and I could sneak a look from time to time.  I wish I had spent money on renting a Fanvision as I would have been able to see much more of the action.  I’m not sure if I would be as happy as I wouldn’t be able to use my earplugs, but who knows.  If you don’t have a screen to watch the action, I would highly recommend a Fanvision in order to keep up with what is happening around the track itself.  At turn 5, there really wasn’t much action happening for the entire race.  Cars would go by really quickly and that’s about it.  I enjoyed it a lot but had to guess what happened a little when Michael Schumacher crashed into Sergio Perez and brought the one yellow flag of the race.  I also couldn’t tell when the race would end either.  It was a difficult time to keep track of the race but in the end, Sebastian Vettel won the race with Jenson Button in second and Mark Webber in third.  As of writing this entry, Vettel is leading the championship and needs just 1 point to win it.  Jenson Button is in second and needs to win every race to win the championship.  It is more than likely that Sebastian Vettel will win the championship in Japan on October 9th.

All in all, the race was a great experience.  It was the best race I had ever been to, albeit I have only attended 3 races in my life now.  It could be a combination of a vacation and how close I was to the actual action.  Singapore really knows how to throw a great party and they should be patted on the back for it.  I am reminded of a story about the Olympics themselves.  When I went to the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics, everyone, including foreign media, reported how much fun it was to be in the city.  It was a real party atmosphere.  When people went to the 2008 Beijing Olympics, they said it was a great event but outside of the event it was very boring.  When going to the races in Japan, I found it to be more alike Beijing than Vancouver.  While the location of the course itself is partly to blame, I feel that having more F1 related activities in Nagoya or Osaka could help a lot.  The same goes for Moto GP.  They cities near the events need to make it a destination in order to bring people in and keep them in.  Doing so would help increase the number of visitors as well as people who visit the area for more than just a passing weekend.   The Singapore Grand Prix is a race I would love to see again, but not sure if I’ll do it anytime soon.  You will get a race that is held at night so that you can enjoy the city by day.  You can party it up with all of the F1 related activities both inside and outside of the circuit itself.  It is a non-stop weekend that I highly recommend.

2011 Formula 1 Singtel Singapore Grand Prix is part of a series of posts detailing my experiences of visiting various F1 races around the world.  To read more about the various races I have attended, please follow the links below:

Information:

Official Website:  http://www.singaporegp.sg/

Barbecuing in Tokyo October 4, 2011

Posted by Dru in Food, Japan, Tokyo.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Barbecuing in Tokyo” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-Ip

Tokyo is a tough place to barbecue.  Barbecuing back home in Canada involved a gas grill, a bunch of friends if they are available and a selection of meats and salads.  When someone wanted a steak, it was pretty easy to fire up the grill, throw on a couple steaks, and within 15 minutes, you were ready to eat.  No need to really do any preparations.  If you had a party, of course you had to prepare a lot but not that much.  If you wanted something good, you would have to marinate the meat overnight, and prepare all the vegetables and salads.  Grilling in your backyard was a very simple affair and something that people routinely did.  Tokyo, a city where there are relatively few, if any backyards, and if someone does have a backyard, it is usually very small.  Land space is expensive and prohibitive to having large yards.  Barbecuing in Japan presents its own unique challenges that must be met head first.

The first thing one must learn is that barbecuing in Tokyo is essentially illegal.  You cannot set up a barbecue on the side of a river or in a park.  It is illegal to have an open fire within the city limits of Tokyo.  Whether that applies to private property or not is unknown to me.  I have seen people with somewhat larger yards and balconies where they can barbecue, however being Tokyo and Japan, you do have to be aware of your neighbors.  One of my friends had bought a grill and started to barbecue in front of his house, outside his front door.  While the street in front of his house was primarily for pedestrians, as cars would not fit, his neighbors were polite but complained quickly.  After using it once, he never had the opportunity to use it again.  The only legal place to barbecue is within one of the city’s parks.  There are websites that direct you to the various parks within the city that allow people to barbecue.  Since Tokyo is such a large and dense city, they require reservations before you can barbecue at these sites.  The only problem is that these locations fill up very quickly and are usually reserved months in advance.  Unless you have connections or a bit of luck, you won’t be getting into these locations.  It can be a hassle to find a place in Tokyo for a barbecue, but thankfully there is one last emergency measure, an illegal barbecue.  There are just a few places around Tokyo where you can safely, yet illegally, barbecue.  I don’t recommend it but there are lots of people who do it.

The food and cooking style at a Japanese barbecue is slightly different compared to a typical American style barbecue.  I’m used to hearing about people grilling burgers, steaks, and hot dogs.  In Japan, it can be similar but in a very Japanese way.  I often see Korean style barbecue meats, or thinly sliced meats.  Seeing seafood is also very popular in Tokyo.  Vegetables tend to be the same.  Just putting raw vegetables on the grill and letting them cook.  Like most barbecues, you can grill almost anything you want.  One of the bigger problems with grilling in Tokyo is getting the fire started.  Coming from Canada, there is only one person I know of who has a traditional charcoal fired grill.  He has all of the items from the charcoal heater to the good charcoal.  In Tokyo, I had to learn how to set up a grill and get the fire going.  It is very common for people, including myself, to just buy charcoal and grab a bunch of old newspapers and figure it would be easy to start the fire.  I was very wrong and the first barbecue I had, it took about an hour to get it started!  The second time on was much easier for me.  I knew the idea of how to start it, but having a starter fuel is idyllic.  At the end of a Japanese barbecue, noodles and vegetables are brought out.  All grills come with a flat pan that is heated to create a griddle.  This griddle is used to cook yaki-soba.  Yaki-soba is a very traditional end to any barbecue in Japan.  If you ask any Japanese person what they should have at a barbecue, especially as a last dish, they will almost certainly say yaki-soba.  While I don’t like it, it is very common in Japan and should be expected.

Like any barbecue, in the end, there are no rules in what you must do or how you do it.  A barbecue in America/Canada is essentially the same as one in Japan.  While the food is different the idea of getting together with a group of friends to enjoy a beautiful sunny afternoon is no different.  The logistics are much harder in Tokyo but on the plus side, you can drink alcohol in public so having a beer or a glass of wine at a barbecue is perfectly acceptable.  Having a loud group of friends laughing the afternoon away is no different between Japan and North America.  If you ever get a chance, you should try having a barbecue in Japan.  If you can’t have a traditional barbecue where you grill outdoors, you can always go to a yakiniku restaurant instead.  It doesn’t have the same appeal, but it is better than nothing, and you don’t have to prepare anything.

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

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