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2011 Sakura May 3, 2011

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over to read “2011 Sakura” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-FY

 

It is officially the end of the sakura season for 2011.  The sakura season began in early April and lasted for just under 1 week for the full bloom.  This year has been a very mixed year in Tokyoand Japandue to the Great East Japan Earthquake.  The sakura season in Tokyoand Japanare no exception either.  While things had started to return to normal at the start of April, things were not completely back to normal.  The state of Tokyo itself was still in a mild state of shock and the history of the cherry blossoms had reminded people of the traditional stories that had been passed down from generation to generation and taught in various textbooks and media.

Aside from the actual beauty of the cherry blossoms, there is a lot of symbolism and many stories.  I have heard a lot of these and only found a little information in English that was easy to research and find information on.  Mortality is the main symbol of the cherry blossoms.  They have been a symbol of our mortality and how life can be very short yet beautiful.  The cherry blossoms start to bud and within a week of budding they are blooming.  Shortly after that, the spring winds blow the petals away leaving nothing but the nearly bare branches exposed for a short time before the leaves replace them.  It’s a very short process that takes only a few weeks.  If you are lucky, the cherry blossoms are in full bloom for almost two weeks, but for most of the time it is around one week.  This year the symbolism of mortality has been especially poignant this year due to the Great East Japan Earthquake (Tohoku Earthquake).  With over 10,000 people found dead at the start of Tokyo’s cherry blossom season, many people were still unable to get past the sadness that the country has endured for what was less than a month.  The region was also dealing with the ongoing nuclear crisis and wondering what would arise from such problems in the future.  Needless to say the atmosphere in Tokyo was far from celebratory.

I mentioned two years ago that there was a fairy tale that highlighted the fact that many dead bodies were buried under the cherry trees and that their souls were linked to the trees themselves.  Since then, I have heard a few more stories that included the “fact” that the ashes of the dead were scattered around the base of the cherry trees as well.  The symbolism of this act was that the people who died would be reincarnated as petals within the tree itself.  This is also more so for those who had committed suicide or sacrificed themselves for their country such as those who died or committed suicide for Japan in war.  I still cannot find any information regarding this in any online source however this has been relayed to me by various students.  This is of course changing from person to person but the basics are all the same.  This also creates a tale for children that the trees themselves are haunted.  This is to keep the children away from the trees, especially at night.  Some stories include the fact that if you go to see the cherry trees alone at night, you will die.  I would theorize, as with many other tales, that this was to prevent children from going to see the cherry blossoms alone at night when it could be dangerous.  It is also another reason for many cities to illuminate the blossoms at night in order to “protect” people from being “killed” or “taken away”.

This year in Tokyo was very different indeed.  While I didn’t personally go to any parks to witness the cherry blossom parties, I did have a chance to walk around; see pictures from friends; and hear first hand accounts from my students and friends.  The hanami season (cherry blossom viewing/cherry blossom party) was definitely different.  There were less people and less noise.  Most of the famous parks were quieter than normal.  Most companies had cancelled their parties and most parties were of friends and families only.  The Governor of Tokyo, Mr. Ishihara, called on everyone to refrain from having hanami parties and to respect the dead in the difficult times.  There were many opinions about this action and I will refrain from voicing mine as much as possible.  This basically caused a lot of companies to cancel their plans, if they had any, and most of the parks that lit up the trees at night were dark.  Several parks had signs that requested people to avoid having parties under the cherry blossoms and the few parties that I did see were very quiet affairs.  Rather than the raucous parties where people drink excessively, I would imagine that people just enjoyed a few drinks and enjoyed the chatting more.  Of course I wasn’t there so I can’t truly comment on the outcome.  It could well be that there were some groups that were pretty loud but I can’t say for sure.

Unfortunately, the parks were not as busy as a regular year.  This could also be a blessing for some however it was still busy.  Unlike most years where you would be hard pressed to find a good spot to enjoy the cherry blossoms, this year you could find spaces without looking too hard.  The party mood was definitely more sombre than normal however it will be an anomaly.  I’m sure that by next year the parties will return and the drunken mess will be back.  Tokyo will be its regular happy and raucous self.

Cherry Blossom Information:

Wikipedia:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cherry_blossom

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

2010 Sakura March 26, 2010

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “2010 Sakura” and other posts from this blog.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-ow

It’s that time of year again.  It is now official.  The Japan Meteorological Agency has officially announced that the cherry blossoms in Tokyo are blooming.  This is a wonderful, if somewhat annoying, time of year.  The year is full of beautiful cherry trees that are full of pink blossoms.  You also have hundreds, if not thousands of people relaxing in the parks enjoying copious amounts of alcohol.  Love it or hate it, it’s a beautiful time of year.

For more information about the Sakura Season, please refer to my old blog post from last year:  http://wp.me/s2liAm-sakura

Information:

List of Sakura viewing sites (Japanese only):  http://www.mapple.net/sp_sakura/
Yahoo! Japan (Japanese only):  http://sakura.yahoo.co.jp/
Yahoo! Japan (Tokyo region – Japanese only):  http://sakura.yahoo.co.jp/spot/list/13.html

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Tokyo (Nippori) December 22, 2009

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Tokyo (Nippori)” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-iQ

Nippori is an overlooked area of Tokyo.  Most people who do venture to this area will more than likely pass straight through it.  It can be considered a focal gateway to Saitama, a residential city to the north of Tokyo.  There really isn’t much for the regular tourist, but there area a couple of interesting things to see and do that could warrant a visit.  The first would be the Fabric Town, and the other would be the Yanaka Cemetery.  The other main reason to visit Nippori is to head to Narita Airport.  It’s a popular transfer point for those on the west side of Tokyo who want to save some money by taking the Keisei Skyliner instead of the Narita Express.

The first thing to do in Nippori, would depend on your purpose.  If you want to see the cemetery, I’d recommend heading there first.  It’s a large area with a long history.  If you head to the southern exit, you will be near the central entrance of the cemetery.  From here, it’s a short walk up the hill to reach Tennoji Temple.  This is a nice little temple with a seated Buddha inside.  It’s actually a bit of a surprise as the outside appears somewhat modern and inside is a quaint little Buddhist Temple.  It’s a nice place to go and relax for a few minutes, but the temple itself is pretty small.  From there, you can head straight into the centre of the cemetery.  The entire cemetery is lined with cherry trees.  It is very beautiful in the spring as the entire area is bathed in pink from the cherry blossoms.  In the autumn, it’s the same, but with colourful leaves.  Yanaka Cemetery is also one of the most famous cemeteries in Japan with various writers, poets, politicians, and scholars.

Fabric town is located on the opposite side of Nippori Station.  It’s a short walk from the station, and a little difficult to find.  Look around the main entrance of the station, where all the taxis park, and you’ll find a few signs pointing you in the general direction.  You have to walk past a major street before you enter Fabric Town.  While it is called Fabric Town, it’s more or less of a street.  There are very few shops located off the street that sell fabric, so don’t worry about venturing off the main street.  Here, if you love to buy fabric of any type, this is the place to be.  You can find various patterns, colours, thread, accessories, and so on.  The fabric can come in silk, polyester, cotton, and even leather.  If you love arts and crafts, enjoy sewing, or just looking for a good costume idea, this is a great place to get started.  Metres of fabric can start at 100 yen each.  Often, there are spools of fabric just sitting in bins in front of each shop inviting you to enter.  Once inside, you’ll have to decide what you want, how much you are willing to spend, and how to bring it home.  Husbands beware, if your wife loves sewing and crafts, you might want to drop her off and head over to Ueno for a little shopping, or even Akihabara to look at more electronics.

Other than that, there really isn’t much to see or do around the station.  There are a few shops to visit, some izakayas and restaurants, but other than that, it’s a pretty boring place.  The only interesting shop would be the Edwin store.  They have a large shop located in front of the station where you can buy all of their latest jeans.  Edwin is a Japanese jean maker whose headquarters are located at the end of Fabric Town.  It is akin to Evisu jeans, although Edwin is not as big, nor as popular as Evisu.  Either way, happy shopping.

Nippori Information:

Nippori (An article about an area that I barely visited in Nippori): http://www.nihonsun.com/2009/06/01/nippori-shopping-street-a-shotengai-worth-a-visit/
Nippori:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nippori_Station
Yanaka Cemetery:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanaka_Cemetery
Fabric Town Blog Post:  http://www.askingfortrouble.org/crafts/2007/11/02/tokyo-shopping-guide-tomato/
Edwin Jeans:  http://www.edwin.co.jp/index.html

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

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