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Tokyo – Ikebukuro February 14, 2012

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Tokyo – Ikebukuro” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-H1

Ikebukuro is a somewhat forgotten city in Tokyo.  It is located on the north western edge of the Yamanote Line and isn’t as conveniently located as Shinjuku or as famous as Shibuya.  It is often known more as a transfer town where many people stop, do a bit of shopping, then continue home.  Ikebukuro is a major hub for people heading north-west towards western Tokyo and western Saitama.  Rail lines to the west spread out in similar fashion to Shinjuku and Shinagawa however they move more northerly.  While the town may be a transfer town, there are many things to see and do and a reputation that can make it feel like a younger sibling to Shinjuku.

There are many ways to arrive at Ikebukuro.  The most common way is to use the Yamanote Line, but there are countless other lines as well.  Ikebukuro can be split into 4 major areas.  The western side of the station is a quaint little town that is full of life and spirit.  Just outside the west exit is a public art space inside a park.  There are several sculptures in an open square along with the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Space.  This is a large concert hall that has various concerts and performances all year.  It is also home to the largest pipe organ in Tokyo with free lunch hour shows.  Unfortunately, when I visited recently, the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Space was closed for renovations.  I’m sure it will reopen soon enough.  The west side is quieter than the east and not as built up.  There are various smaller shops and more tranquil parks in the area.  There are several ethnic restaurants that are there to please all tastes.  It is also home to a small outdoor goods section with a few shops specializing in hiking and camping gear.

To the north of the station is a small area that is akin to Kabukicho in Shinjuku.  It is definitely not as well known and in some ways a bit more dangerous.  Like Kabukicho, this district is home to many clubs, bars, and adult themed shops.  It is also home to various restaurants where you can get good cheap food.  Somehow bars and the seedy underground business go hand in hand.  I would guess that drinking and risky business really complement each other.  During the day, this area is probably not as interesting to most people; however it can give a glimpse into what happens in the area and the type of people who frequent it.  There is also a small bridge that crosses over the train tracks which provides a great view of Ikebukuro Station and how busy the station gets as the trains constantly enter and exit the station.  While Shinjuku and Tokyo have more trains running through the station, Ikebukuro has more chaos as tracks crisscross each other creating a spaghetti-like mess below the bridge.

The east side of the station is where most of the action is.  The area immediately to the east and up to Sunshine City is a very busy urban centre.  When visiting this area, you will feel that it is busier and more chaotic than Shinjuku.  This is due to the nature of the area.  There are relatively few tunnels connecting each area and the shops are all crammed together.  The main roads and crossings are always crowded and it can be difficult to stop and smell the roses.  People will push to get to their destination and people will also push to get you into their shops.  It can take several days to explore this entire region.  The usual electronic shops are rampant near the station with various fashion boutiques along the main street to Sunshine City.  Just before Sunshine City is Otome Road.  This is a small 2 block section full of anime and manga shops.  It can give Akihabara a run for its money but unfortunately due to the size of the area, it still pales in comparison.  The shops are relatively large compared to the small shops in Akihabara which make it much easier to find things.  The shops are also well concentrated in the 2 block section with almost nothing else beyond those blocks.

For those who want something touristy, Amlux is a Toyota showcase that is akin to Megaweb in Odaiba.  It is very similar with the one exception that you can’t easily test drive the cars.  It costs more money and requires early reservations to test drive cars in Amlux.  They have similar models on display and rather than a wide open space, all the cars are crammed into a typical office building.  They still have the same amusement style rides for kids of all ages, such as driving simulators, and a few race cars on display.  Megaweb is by far the better of the two but Amlux is still a great place to visit.  Connected to Amlux, and just across the street of Otome Road is Sunshine City.  This is one of the most famous building complexes in Ikebukuro.  It is home of the 60 story Sunshine Tower with an observation deck with spectacular 360 degree views.  Note that when I say spectacular, it’s mostly a view of Tokyo so don’t expect to see many mountains nearby or a lot of nature.  Expect to see a sprawling urban landscape.  The Sunshine City complex itself has lots to offer.  There is a basic shopping mall on the main floors as well as Namja Town, and Aquarium, and Planetarium at one end of the complex.  Namja Town is a theme park run by Sega Sammy.  It is geared towards children but they also have a few things for adults and couples.  Namja Town is well known as a place to enjoy gyoza.  Gyoza is pan fried dumplings and Namja Town boasts that they have the largest variety of gyoza for sale.  It can take a few days to try all of the gyoza available but it can be done.  Do note that there is an admission fee to enter Namja Town on top of the cost to purchase gyoza and play various games.  The aquarium and planetarium used to be very basic and standard fares.  They are undergoing renovations and will reopen this year.  The aquarium was nothing to celebrate before the renovations.  It was a small place that took only 20 minutes to walk through.  It was a very disappointing experience.  Unfortunately I can’t comment on how things will be after the renovations.

Ikebukuro is a great place to visit, but to be honest, not an essential place to visit when visiting Tokyo.  If there is something specific you’d like to see, you should visit Ikebukuro.  However, there are other areas with more options.  Shinjuku has the Tokyo Metropolitan Towers which has a free observation deck.  Roppongi also has a similar observation deck for a fee.  Odaiba has Megaweb along with other interesting things.  Rather than going to Otome Road, you can visit Akihabara to see manga, anime, and electronics, or better yet, go to Nakano and see manga and anime.  If you happen to be staying in Ikebukuro, it is a good place to stay and explore.  If you are staying elsewhere, you probably won’t need to visit the area unless you have visited every other area ofTokyo.

Ikebukuro Information:

Ikebukuro (Japan Guide):  http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e3038.html

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Tokyo – Kinshicho April 12, 2011

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Tokyo – Kinshicho” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-Co

Kinshicho is the last major centre in Tokyo before you are in the suburbs, or heading towards Chiba.  It is located just a few minutes outside of Akihabara and one station away from Ryogoku.  The area itself is not very interesting for most travellers, but for those of you who use the Narita Express to enter or leave Tokyo, you will pass through Kinshicho.  When leaving Tokyo, just after you exit the tunnel, you will be in Kinshicho.  The area has a storied past and a growing future.  As any other part of Tokyo, Kinshicho is constantly changing and evolving.  What it will be like in 10 years is anyone’s guess, but the chances are that it will get much better.

The first thing to do in Kinshicho is to decide whether you want to go north or south.  Depending on what you want to see or do, each side will have its own purpose.  The south is considered the seedier side of Kinshicho.  In the south, you have two infamous things to do.  The first, less seedy, is the JRA (Japan Racing Association) building.  It is the easiest location to access in the east for horse race betting.  It’s not uncommon to see hundreds of men around the JRA building on a Friday evening, or even on Saturday and Sunday.  Horse race betting is still huge in Japan but not too many people talk about it.  It’s very common to see older men hanging out in front of the building just looking at the current horse races and deciding who to bet on.  I have never been inside the actual building but the betting process itself is pretty simple.  All you really have to do is go up to a computer terminal, select the horse you want to win and so on and that’s that.  Insert your money and you are done.  I’m not sure if there are English instructions as I’m not interested in the horse races but if you do walk around the outside, you can watch some of the races from a TV screen located in one of the lounges.  Note that you will find JRA buildings all over Tokyo and Japan but these are rarely where the races are held.  They are just betting offices with TVs set up for people to satisfy their gambling habits.  Racing happens near Shinagawa and out west from Tokyo.

The other seedy part to Kinshicho has to be the hostess clubs in the south.  Behind the JRA building will be several dozen clubs and bars.  Most of these are the cheaper cousins of their expensive Ginza and Kabukicho counterparts.  It’s still somewhat seedy during the day and the fact that there are several tall buildings obscuring the actual area makes it interesting.  Once you walk behind the JRA building at night, you’ll suddenly come upon several buildings with various lights flashing and men trying to push you into their clubs so that you can spend several tens of thousands of yen.  Nearby you can also find several love hotels that are more functional than fun.  Walking around in the area late at night may not be safe for everyone and it definitely isn’t as safe as Kabukicho.  There is a reason many people call Kinshicho the Kabukicho of the east and I would tend to agree for just this area alone.  The bad thing is that people tend to associate Kinshicho with these clubs and only these clubs these days.  When I talked about the storied past of Kinshicho, I was talking about these clubs in the south, but I was also referencing the fact that Kinshicho, botn north and south, was once a central area for the Yakuza, Japanese organized crime.  These days they are limited more to the southern areas.

While the south may sound like a bad area to visit, due to its reputation, the shops tend to be a lot cheaper.  You have a greater tendancy to find good cheap restaurants to eat in, cheap goods, and shopping tends to be more Japanese in flavour.  There is a small department store, small for Tokyo standards, and a small Yodobashi Camera.  Kinshicho has the usual set of small ramen and donburi shops as well as one of several Wallmart shops in Tokyo.  While they go under the name Seiyu, or as most people in Kinshicho say, Livin.  The company known as Seiyu is actually a wholely owned subsidiary of Wallmart.  It can be great as they offer the most competitive prices for their items and they also sell Wallmart goods.  It’s great to find really cheap food products when shopping there, but that isn’t always the case.  When shopping it is always true that if you visit one shop, they specialize in one type of food while another specializes in others.  It never hurts to shop around but it does take a lot more time to get things done.

The north side of Kinshicho has undergone a dramatic change over the last 5-10 years, or so I’ve been told.  In the past it was a Yakuza neighbourhood.  There would be several yakuza living in the area and the area was fairly “dangerous” to live in.  While I think it could be dangerous, as long as you keep to yourself in any such area, you should be okay.  In Japan, I don’t believe the organized crime is actually going to start shooting people randomly or have a gang war, but those were possibilities.  Today, things are very different.  The entire area has undergone some revitalization and a type of gentrification.  Many of the local businesses have put up signs saying that the Yakuza are no longer welcome in their shops and to leave the area.  Many of them seem to have relocated more towards the south and east and many of them have “left” their organizations.  In fact, as of the writing of this post, the police are cracking down on organized crime for various reasons which allow many areas to be revitalized.  The north area of Kinshicho is one of them.  One of the first major turning points in the north’s revitalization has to be the Olinas mall.  It is a larger western style shopping mall with lots of underground parking and various shops inside.  There is a theatre as well as a small food court as well.  The layout is a bit confusing to get around but it’s a nice place to do a bit of shopping, but for those looking for a Japanese style of life, this is not the place to go.  It is your typical western shopping mall teeming with teenagers.

One of the focal points of Kinshicho has to be Kinshi Park.  It’s a medium sized park for Tokyo that is currently undergoing renovations.  Renovations should be completed by the end of 2011, but this is just my own personal guess.  In the north east corner is the Sumida City Gymnasium.  It is a public community centre of sorts where you can do all kinds of sports.  You can play basketball, badminton, table tennis, go swimming, participate in aerobics, or even use a weight room.  The gym was completed in March 2010 and still looks very new.  The facilities are very cheap but you do need to share with the others who use it.  Next to the gym on the west side is a set of tennis courts.  If you have never practiced playing tennis in Tokyo, you will be in for a bit of a surprise.  They utilize a type of artificial turf and rubber pebbles to simulate grass.  Unlike typical artificial turf, this type seems to have a little flexibility and might be easier on your joints, but I haven’t personally tried it so I can’t comment too much on it.  It is still very popular and getting a chance to use it is still difficult.  In the south east corner of the park they are erecting a dual baseball field.  Basically it will be two baseball diamonds back to back that is designed for practice rather than real competition.  For real competition, I believe they will utilize just none of the diamonds at a time.  It’s an interesting design and it will be finished in early 2011.  As for the rest of the park, most of it is just open space with a bit of greenery.  I’m not sure how much will stay the same but the large open area is popular for young students to play in and for people to just relax on a nice spring afternoon.  If you need a little spiritual help, there is a small shrine located on the south west corner that provides a very unique look at Japan.

Aside from the park and Olinas, the other main anchor of the north has to be the Arcakit building and the Termina complex that surrounds the station.  The Arcakit main building has several floors of shopping including a large Daiso.  There are lots of things to see and do inside and it can be treated as its own shopping mall.  Be aware that there will be lots of families there as there is a famous baby shop where you can buy bulk items and almost anything you can imagine a child would want.  If you fancy a nice meal, I’d recommend the top floor of the building as the north facing shops have wonderful views of Tokyo Sky Tree which is nearly completed.  If the station area is not of much interest to you, you can always head just a little north into the small side streets.  This area has various little shops and restaurants of varying quality.  Some restaurants are very delicious and others are not so.  It can be hit or miss but it’s something that you have to try on your own. If you are interested in enjoying a little music, especially classical music, the Sumida Triphony Hall located in the Tobu Hotel is a very popular place.  Almost every weekend has a major concert and the halls are available for rent, at a price of course.  If that doesn’t interest you that much, they do have a shuttle bus that runs nearly daily and it can take you to Disneyland.

I think that Kinshicho itself will be undergoing a small change in the near future due to its proximity to Tokyo Sky Tree.  In order to cash in on the new attraction in the area, Kinshicho will have to do something.  While it’s difficult to cash in on it as Kinshicho is a little far from the tower itself, they will need to change a little in order to create a destination spot for domestic travellers.  I’m sure it could happen if the right people do the right things.  Removing some of the old and dirty shops is a start.  The small delicious shops will have to stay to retain the character of Kinshicho and some of the buildings will need a small renovation to make it more inviting to the casual shopper.  Like most areas, they need to find a niche that will attract people.  The north will continue to change with time as families and tourists start to take over.  Shop owners will be forced to change and the community will want to do something about it.  The south may not change much, if at all due to the character of the people and the lack of viewing locations of Tokyo Sky Tree.  Tokyo Sky Tree will be the major catalyst for the entire region, but it will still depend on the people and businesses in the area.

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

1 year later August 14, 2009

Posted by Dru in Uncategorized.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “1 Year Later” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-fm

Today marks this blog’s birthday.  Dru’s Misadventures is now one year old.  This blog was originally supposed to be a blog about my life.  However, I soon realized that no one would be very interested in my life, per se.  My passion for travelling around Japan would be far more interesting, so I decided to start writing about the places I have visited.  My first real post was about Beijing.  This was quickly followed by a post about Matsushima, which I visited the month before.  From there, I talked about baseball, football, and other cities in Japan.  I have also touched a little on culture, but I have mainly talked about travelling.

This blog now holds two purposes in my life.  One is to write an account of the places I have been and to hopefully share it with others.  It can be difficult to remember things that we have done in the past, and this is one of the best ways I can think of to remind myself of the sights, sounds, and smells of each place.  I can only hope that my writing has helped others, and hopefully yourself to understand the places I’ve been, and to hopefully get an idea of what things can be like if you ever visit those cities.  If you ever have questions about different places, always feel free to ask.  The other reason I’m writing this blog is to help my students learn English.  I am an English teacher in Japan and I use this blog as a way to help students learn English.  I hope that my own personal writing provides a nice variety of English words and phrases for them to learn, as well as to hopefully get a better understanding of my own personality.  I always encourage people to ask me questions, especially if they don’t understand something that I write.  While I am better at teaching face to face, I can always type an answer to any questions you may have.

It has been about one year since I first started this blog, and I’m very happy to hear from people around the world.  I haven’t done much to promote my blog.  As I have mentioned, this is more of a hobby than anything else.  While it is simple to write about Tokyo and get lots of people to my site, hopefully my journeys to the less traveled places in Japan will encourage people, especially expats living in Japan, to travel within Japan even more.  Since the first year I was in Japan, my view of Japan has changed dramatically.  I have been able to learn a lot about the people, its history, and its culture.  I do have to say that my first year of travels within Japan has been very doe eyed, compared to the way I see things now.  Now, I can look at Japan in a more understanding way, and be capable to finding new things easily.  The first time you ever visit a city should never be the last.  It can take two or even three times to visit a city completely.  While I have touched on many places in Japan, I always find new adventures on the second or even third time.  I hope that you will also be able to venture to these beautiful cities someday.

Ending this post, I would like to share a few stats with you:

In the first 4 months, this blog averaged 125 hits.  From December until February of 2009, I averaged 185 hits a month.  That was my first big jump in hits.  Since March of this year, the average has been 308 hits a month, and last month was the biggest yet, with 404.  It’s only halfway into August and there are over 200 hits.  It’s possible that this blog has reached an average of 400 hits a month, but only time will tell.  In terms of per day hits, things started well in the first month, but got worse towards the end of 2008.  By March, 2009, the average per day hit count has been over 10.  Hopefully that will continue to rise for the foreseeable future.  The busiest day, ever, was when I first started this blog.  I received 39 hits on August 24th, 2008, but on August 11th, 2009, I received 32.  That’s pretty close to the record.  Hopefully that will be broken within the next year.  It seems that most people are interested in the Azabu Juban Festival, as it has the most searches.  In terms of what people find interesting, by far, my post on Kabukicho is the most popular, followed by the Azabu Juban post.  Football comes in third.  Finally, I must thank IHC Way, as without their link, most of you wouldn’t even know about me.  I hope you can all put a link and tell others about this blog as I don’t do any advertising.

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Sapporo February 17, 2009

Posted by Dru in Hokkaido, Japan, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Sapporo” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/s2liAm-sapporo

This is Part V of a multi-part series chronicling my motorcycle adventure from Tokyo to Sapporo and back again.

Background:  In 2007, I had finally gotten my Japanese driver’s license and a motorcycle.  I had been an avid motorcycle rider in Canada before I came to Japan, so after 2 years of no riding, I finally bought a motorcycle and decided to go on a big adventure.  I went from Tokyo to Sapporo by motorcycle and ferry.  It was an adventure to say the least.

Leg 5 (Sapporo)

Sapporo is a beautiful city.  It’s the biggest city in Hokkaido, but it doesn’t feel like such a big city.  It’s quite similar to Vancouver.  The streets tend to be wider than average Japanese cities, and the streets are all numbered.  While the numbering is difficult to learn, it should get easier if you spend enough time in Sapporo.  In Sapporo, addresses go by the block number and compass orientation, for example, 2N 3E and so on.  It’s a little confusing at first, and since I only spent about a day in total in Sapporo,  I didn’t get used to it at all. My initial impression would be that Sapporo would be very easy to navigate, but boy was I wrong.  Going from Chitose to Sapporo wasn’t difficult.  It was navigating Sapporo itself and finding my hotel that was a pain.  I found Sapporo station relatively easily, but finding my bearings to get to my hotel itself was difficult.  I ended up finding a convenience store to get directions.  Convenience stores are my second choice for finding directions.  They are everywhere in Japan.  There was one problem.  After getting directions, I got lost again, and asked a cop for directions again when I was close to the hotel.  Once there, I parked my bike and wouldn’t touch it again for a couple days.

Getting to Sapporo is a lot easier if you are taking a train.  The train station is not the centre of the town, but it is a major centre.  Most of the city’s heart is located on the South side of the station.  I took a look at the North, but it looked similar to any other business district of Japan, so I headed south.  The first thing you will see is a nice open space with a few sculptures.  The station itself is quite beautiful.  It is very modern and suits the city’s spirit.  It is a large brown and gray building with a large blue clock in the middle.  There is shopping in every direction from the main entrance.  If you go without enough clothes, there are many shops selling warm clothing.  If you continue to look south, you will see many tree lined streets.  It’s quite beautiful, and it might be even better in the snow.  Heading south, you’ll run into the former Hokkaido Government buildings.  It’s a wonderful park to visit with lots of green trees and a couple large ponds.  I recommend taking a nice walk from Sapporo station and stopping at this site on your way to Odori Park.

By far, the most popular place to visit in Sapporo is Odori Park.  It’s the most famous park in Sapporo.  It is 1.5 km long and spans 13 blocks.  It is also the centre of Sapporo.  On one end is Sapporo TV Tower and on the other end is the Sapporo City Archive Museum.  In the February, the Yuki-matsuri (Snow Festival) is held, and in the summer, several portables are built to create a large beer garden that spans a couple blocks.  The Yuki-matsuri is the most famous event in Sapporo.  I have seen pictures and it is quite beautiful.  I will be heading there in February and will write about it in the future.  I was a little early to attend the beer gardens, but I’m sure it would be a little overpriced, but wonderful.  Each major Japanese beer label was in the process of building the gardens, so having your choice of beer wouldn’t be difficult.  It looked much better than the Tokyo beer gardens because they are all in one place, and it’s easy to choose your favourite one.  There is only one thing to know about Odori Park.  It’s very boring if there is nothing happening, unless you are a kid.  There are a few places where children can play all day and never get tired.
The final area of Sapporo that is of interest is Susukino.  It’s regarded as the Kabukicho of Sapporo, a red light district.  In this regard, it is considered a place to get sex, but in reality, it isn’t that bad.  Like Kabukicho, it’s a reputation that is hard to shake.  Being a “red light district”, it has the most restaurants in Sapporo.  There is a famous ramen street where you can get Sapporo ramen.  There are also many izakayas and countless bars.  If you are looking for someplace to get a good cheap meal, this is the place.  It is also one of the main locations for the Yuki-matsuri.  I can’t really say too much about this place as I didn’t explore too much.  If you do go, be a little more careful as things could be a little dangerous, in terms of Japanese danger.

Sapporo is a wonderful place to visit, and I definitely want to go again and again.  If you can visit Sapporo directly, I do recommend it.  If you are spending a couple weeks in Japan, and can afford the plane ticket, it’s worth it.  If you have a JR Pass, I don’t recommend it because there are no Shinkansen trains that go to Sapporo.  It takes too much time to get there by train at the moment.  Hokkaido itself is quite easy to explore by train, so if you fly to Sapporo and have a JR Hokkaido pass, you can enjoy yourself for a full week or two and still have things to do.

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Tokyo (Shinjuku – East side and Kabukicho) Part III December 15, 2008

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Tokyo (Shinjuku – East side of Kabukicho)” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-4R

This is Part III of my Shinjuku post. Please go to my first and second post for more information Shinjuku .

 

Shinjuku Nichome is an infamous district in Tokyo.  It’s known as the gay and transvestite section of Tokyo.  There are many TV shows showcasing the bars and atmosphere of Nichome.  It is very well known to Tokyoites, however many people rarely venture into this area.  You will definitely see male oriented adult shops, but it’s relatively tame during the daytime.  When the sun goes down, and the bars open up, you’ll start to see people enter and enjoy a crazy time.  While this area is known as a gay district, just West of Nichome and East of the train tracks is Shinjuku Gyoen.  This is one of the Imperial Gardens of Tokyo.  The cost of admission is 200 Yen, and depending on the time of year, it’s worth it.  During the Spring time, you’ll be greeted by tall cherry trees that are completely pink with cherry blossoms.   It can be a beautiful sight.  Beware of the early afternoon and night as it’s also a famous place for Hanami parties.  During the Hanami season, Japanese people gather with their friends or co-workers for a night of drinking beer under the cherry blossoms.  It can become a very exciting night.  During the day, you’ll even see one of the new employees sleeping on a big blue tarp, keeping the space reserved so that his co-workers can join him for the party.  In the Summer time, the trees are green allowing you a beautiful getaway from the city.  You’ll be graced with the presence of rare birds and fauna for Tokyo as well.  In late Autumn there is a Chrysanthemum exhibit and the Autumn Leaves season.  This is when all the leaves turn a magnificent red, yellow, and orange.  Like the cherry blossom season, you must be very lucky to be here at that time.  Being one week too early or too late will not help you.  The season lasts around one week, max.  If you just happen to be here at that time, this is a place that I’d definitely recommend.  Note that in Winter, the leaves of most trees have fallen, and the grass begins to turn yellow or brown, so it isn’t worth it.  Avoid December-March.

Kabukicho is considered to be the most dangerous place in Tokyo, if not Japan.  It’s Tokyo’s unofficial red light district and home to many bars, clubs, and adult (sex) shops.  Like most places where sex is the main attraction, you’ll be able to enjoy great food in this area.  Restaurants and bars are everywhere and getting fast food is also very easy.  If you miss your train and need food or coffee, this is probably the most guaranteed area where you’ll find something.  You may even be surprised by the quality of the food.  The clubs, on the other hand, tend to have mixed results.  While I have never visited one myself, they range from typical host and hostess clubs (kabakura), to strip clubs.  Dancing is better in Roppongi or Shibuya.  Visiting a host or hostess club is a very strange experience, from what I’ve been told.  You are basically paying to drink and talk to someone.  The bill usually starts from 10,000 yen, and there are no limits.  The women in this area can be quite beautiful, however they tend to be dressed in very fancy evening gowns and very puffy hair.  The hosts tend to wear cheesy suits and also have puffy (Dragonball) hair.  Unfortunately, foreigners may have a tough time entering one of these clubs as the owners are afraid of foreigners abusing the system and not knowing how to act in one of these clubs.  Each club will be different and the types of girls/guys working there will vary.  While the majority look the same, be aware that there are some transvestite clubs in this area too.  In terms of sex stores and clubs, they are also everywhere, but they tend to be behind opaque curtains.  Many African men, and Japanese of course, will solicit you (mainly men) to enter one of their clubs.  This will probably mean a very high cover charge that you were never told about, or something even more expensive.  I’ll let your own imagination paint the picture.  The good thing is that these guys are rarely, if ever, in the area before 6pm.  However, it’s a great place to walk and see the other side of Japan, the side that most people would like to forget.  Regarding the “most dangerous place in Japan”, I don’t believe this place is that dangerous.  It’s not completely safe, but it’s still safer than the rest of the world.  If you have lived a sheltered life, I don’t recommend it, but if you have travelled a lot, or know how to handle yourself, it’s a fun place to check out.  You don’t have to spend a lot of time here either.  It does get boring, very fast.

So that’s Shinjuku.  In all respects, it is a city unto itself.  If you pick a direction and start walking, you’ll see something different every time.  You can spend two full days exploring the different areas of Shinjuku, but I only recommend one.  There is so much more to see in Tokyo.   However, if you live in Tokyo, please visit Shinjuku often and check out each district.  The “city” has a bad reputation among many people, but it’s still a wonderful city to check out and enjoy.  It literally has something for everyone, unlike most of the other districts in Tokyo.

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

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