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Regions of Japan – Kansai to Okinawa June 14, 2011

Posted by Dru in Chugoku, Japan, Kansai, Kyushu, Okinawa, Shikoku, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Regions of Japan – Kansai to Okinawa” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-F0

Kansai is probably the second most popular area to visit by foreigner.  It is home to Japan’s second largest city Osaka, after discounting Yokohama.  It is also home to the most historically important cities in Japan, Kyoto and Nara.  Kobe is another major city but like Yokohama it can be considered as a suburban city of Osaka.  Kansai is also home of Wakayama which is famous for their Buddhist temples and the ability of foreign guests to spend a night and wake up to the prayers within the temples and Himeji, home to Japan’s most famous castle.  There is so much to talk about in Kansai that it is impossible to summarize it in one paragraph.  The people are very distinct and they have their own dialect.  It is often considered the comedy capital of Japan due to the number of comedians who call Kansai their place of origin.  The people are very outgoing and it is often easy to strike a conversation with a stranger compared to the cold and private Kanto region.  It is often a bit colder than Kanto but the warmth of the people more than make up for it.  There is a bit of a rivalry between people from Kansai and Kanto but I do believe it is more in jest rather than prejudice.  As for the food, Kansai is considered the capital for Japanese “soul food”.  They have things such as okonomiyaki and takoyaki.  They are experts in yaki soba and tonpei yaki.  It is mostly fried food but it is delicious.  Kyoto is a small exception as they specialize mostly in traditional Japanese foods that cost an arm and a leg at times.  Either way Kansai is a food lover’s paradise, unless you are trying to eat healthily.

The western end of Honshu is Chugoku.  It can easily be misinterpreted as China as Chugoku is also the same word for China.  This region is best known as the home of Hiroshima and Okayama however the Sea of Japan side includes Tottori and Shimane which are wonderfully beautiful rural areas in Japan.  The Yamaguchi prefecture is also a beautiful place but I have yet to visit that region.  The Sea of Japan side of Chugoku is best characterized as a rural area that appears to be disconnected to Japan itself.  The people seem to not worry about anything and tend to live life as an independent region to the other regions.  They are a proud area that is popular for domestic travel.  The southern region, in contrast, has been stigmatised by the tragic bombing of Hiroshima.  Most people will overlook Okayama and just visit Hiroshima.  It is a very important historical location and it is a place I highly recommend people to visit if they get the chance.  Unfortunately it can be a terribly humbling place due to the amount of artefacts that remind us of the terrible outcome of the atomic bomb.  You can’t travel within Hiroshima city without seeing reminders left right and centre about the bombing itself.  The people in the city are great and they try to live their lives as normally as possible.  The food is delicious.  They are famous for their oysters as well as okonomiyaki.  Of course Kansai is famous for okonomiyaki but the Hiroshima style is different and in my opinion, better.

Shikoku is a small island that is located just below Honshu.  It is an area that only a few Japanese people visit if they don’t have family in the area.  It also happens to be one of my favourite areas to visit.  It is a diverse region that is made up of 4 prefectures.  Each area is also unique.  The eastern side of Tokushima and the southern prefecture of Kochi often fight over who is better.  There is a very old and popular festival in both prefectures that are visited by thousands of Japanese people each year.  Both festivals claim to be the best and most exciting festivals in Shikoku and to be honest they are both wonderful to see.  While I haven’t been to either in person, it is difficult to travel the region and not see video of the traditional dancing during the festivals.        Ehime is the western prefecture that is well known for its onsen, Dogo onsen.  It is considered the oldest onsen in Japan and has various healing factors.  A little north of Matsuyama is Imabari which is famous for its towels.  In the north, you can also visit Kagawa.  It is famous for its udon noodles and also for Naoshima which is a famous art island.  It is a small island that is filled with various modern art sculptures.  Most of it is free however the main museums are not.  Overall, Shikoku is a very diverse region that rivals most regions of Japan.

Kyushu is the final region.  It is the western most main island of Japan.  It is famous for its food and onsen as well as its nature.  Most people will travel only as far as Fukuoka and northern Kyushu.  This is the area that has the best onsen as well as the best food.  Fukuoka is well known for its regional delicacies as well as being close to Nagasaki.  Nagasaki is not as popular but important for foreign tourists.  The southern region is not as well known but they are famous for shochu and various poultry and pork products.  One of the more interesting, yet overlooked, areas is Yakushima.  It is a small island just south of Kyushu’s main island and setting for Hiyao Miyazaki’s Princess Monomoke.  It is one of the few natural environments unique to Japan.  South of Kyushu is the Ryukyu Island chain which encompasses Okinawa.  Most people will lump Okinawa and the Ryukyu into Kyushu but that shouldn’t be the case.  Okinawa is, in its own right, a separate area.  They have a different history compared to Japan and have been fighting for their own rights as a small “nation within a nation”.  The entire chain of islands is beautiful, from the pictures I have seen, and make a nice vacation spot with lots of opportunities to relax on the beaches.  The culture is very unique with a unique style of music, dress, and language.  The food has been heavily influenced by the regional natural fruits and vegetables as well as the heavy presence of the US military.  One of the most famous items has to be Taco Rice which is basically taco filling on a bed of rice.  They also make use of bitter melon which is unique in Japan as other regions cannot grow bitter melon easily.

There is one region that almost never gets named when talking about regions of Japan.  These are the Izu and Ogasawara Islands (Bonin Islands).  These are a set of small islands that stretch south of Tokyo for over 1000kms.  The Izu Islands are a set of islands that are somewhat populated.  They have a lot of tourism however don’t expect access to be easy.  Farther away are the Ogasawara Islands in which only two islands are inhabited.  The Ogasawara Islands are historically more important that the Izu Islands.  Iwoto, or previously known as Iwo Jima is part of this group of islands where the US fought hard to get a foothold in taking down the old Imperial Japanese Army.  It has been a long time and few people visit these sets of islands.  In fact it is very difficult to get to any island other than Chichijima and Hahajima.  Most people in Japan never even consider visiting these islands so they have evolved into a very self sufficient area.  It is hard to believe that they are Japanese yet they are very much Japanese.

As you can see, Japan is a very long and diverse country.  Each region ranges from cool temperate to sub-tropical.  Japan is bound by 4 seas and 1 ocean.  There are 4 main islands and hundreds of other small islands that span over 1000 kilometres from one end of Japan to the other.  There are several mountain ranges and many diverse rivers.  Each region has their own distinct version of Japanese culture along with their own distinct foods.  People imagine Japan as being a homogeneous culture but they either forget or neglect that there are two indigenous groups, the Ainu in Hokkaido and the Okinawans in Okinawa.  You can also see the various culture differences between each region of Japan that is accentuated by the differences between people in the Kanto region and the Kansai region.  It is a wonderful country with many things to see.  Visiting only a few areas is not enough and visiting at one time of the year is not enough.  It can take a lifetime to fully explore every corner of Japan and even then you’d still have trouble experiencing everything.

Regions of Japan Information:

Wikipedia:
Japan:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_regions_of_Japan
Kansai:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kansai_region
Chugoku:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C5%ABgoku_region
Shikoku:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shikoku
Kyushu:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ky%C5%ABsh%C5%AB
Ryukyu Islands:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryukyu_Islands
Okinawa: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okinawa_Prefecture
Izu Islands:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Izu_Islands
Ogasawara Islands: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bonin_Islands

Japan Guide:  http://www.japan-guide.com/list/e1001.html

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

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Regions of Japan – Nagoya to Hokkaido June 7, 2011

Posted by Dru in Chubu, Hokkaido, Japan, Kanto, Tohoku, Tokyo, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Regions of Japan – Nagoya to Hokkaido” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-EX

 

Japan is a small country that happens to be very long.  From end to end, Japan is well over 1000km long.  It is larger than Germany in terms of land mass and has a very diverse ecosystem.  You have the cold snowy north and the sub-tropical south.  It is a common misconception that Japan is a small country.  I would also argue that many people feel that any country that is outside of their own region is small, especially for Americans and Canadians.  It is important to know that Japan, while small overall, is actually very long which helps create the illusion that it is small.

Japan is divided into 8 main regions with a few sub-regions.  In the north is Hokkaido.  I have written a lot about Sapporo and the various festivals there.  It is a winter wonderland and also a great summer getaway.  In the winter, people head up there for skiing and to enjoy the delicious seafood.  In the summer, the seafood is still around but people go to escape the heat and humidity of the south.  Compared to other regions in Japan, Hokkaido is a relatively stable and sparsely populated region.  It isn’t the “wild west” but it isn’t like Tokyo either.  Getting from point A to point B in Hokkaido can be very difficult due to the sheer distances between cities and towns and the lack of trains can make it a difficult task.  Renting a car is definitely recommended if you want to see the local areas such as Shiretoko but it isn’t a necessity.  The bus network between cities is pretty good and you can get from Sapporo to most cities in Hokkaido by bus.  Planes are not so popular and trains are good for the major cities.  Unfortunately the trains can take a long time to get from place to place but keeping on the main belt from Asahikawa to Sapporo, then down to Hakodate via either Chitose or Niseko is relatively easy.  Be prepared for long travel times and you will have a good time.

Tohoku is the northern section of Honshu, the main island of Japan.  The main island forms an ‘L’ shape and Tohoku is at the top of the ‘L’.  It is a region that is very similar to Hokkaido yet also very temperate in nature.  The most common starting point is Sendai.  Including Sendai, all points north are considered Tohoku.  Points below Sendai are generally Tohoku as well but places such as part of Fukushima can be considered part of the Kanto plains.  Honshu itself is a very mountainous area with mountains bisecting the entire island into the Pacific and Sea of Japan side.  This creates a very distinct feel in each city depending on which coast you are on.  On the Pacific, the winters can be cold but there isn’t a lot of snow.  The Sea of Japan side which includes Akita and Yamagata receive a lot of snow in the winter.  In the summer, this area is more pleasant but the southern regions can be pretty hot and humid.  It is literally a transition between Hokkaido and the temperate south.  There are many local delicacies such as the Aomori apples and the beef tongue of Sendai.  It isn’t a popular place for tourists as there aren’t many things to see and do compared to other regions.  Hokkaido is well known for seafood and snow, but Tohoku doesn’t have a major drawing point for tourists.

Kanto is the centre of Japan.  It is a small section of Japan that includes Tokyo and located at the bend of the ‘L’ of Honshu.  It is where almost everyone goes when they visit Japan and it is a pretty small area.  The entire Kanto region can be considered as Greater Tokyo as many people do commute from the edges of Kanto to get into Tokyo.  Some would argue that there are major cities and industries as well such as Yokohama but the shear size of Tokyo makes Yokohama feel like a twin city similar to the twin cities in Minnesota.  Of course this is not the same however the idea that both cities can be considered the same city, rather twin cities, is true.  There isn’t really much to say or add to this region as most people know about the Kanto region already.  It is the heart of Japan.  Most companies and most people live in this area.  There are not a lot of historical places to visit anymore but places such as Nikko, Kamakura, and Hakone are excellent places with their own unique feel.

Chubu is a very complex region.  There are several sub-regions to Chubu due to its geography.  It is a region that is bound by Mt. Fuji, bordering the north-western area of Kanto and extending west to Kyoto.  It is also one of the most “visited” regions in Japan yet most people never stop to enjoy the region.  I am also a victim of just passing through the region more times than not.  Most people will go up to Mt. Fuji or pass through on their way to Kyoto.  The few people who do go to the Chubu region will usually head off to Niigata and Nagano or do a little business in Nagoya.  Due to the geography of the area is further subdivided into 3 regions.  The lesser known is the Koshinetsu region that encompasses Nagano, Niigata, and Yamanashi.  This area is well known for its snow and excellent onsen however the use of the name Koshinetsu is not popular.  They are more commonly known by their own respective prefectures.  The Hokuriku region is an area on the Sea of Japan side that is bordered by Niigata and Kyoto.  It is considered a northern path to reach Kansai but it is often overlooked by people.  It is still a somewhat remote area that is easily accessible by plane.  Trains do travel to the region but the new Hokuriku Shinkansen isn’t expected to be finished for a long time.  The main sections allowing access from Tokyo to the heart of Hokuriku will be complete in 2014 but the final section to Osaka has yet to be finalized.  As it stands, this area is often overlooked due to its remoteness.  The Tokai region is the most famous region as it is the main route for the Tokaido Shinkansen that links Tokyo to Osaka.  Shizuoka is one of the biggest prefectures in Japan yet very few people will visit it.  The most famous area is Nagoya where you can enjoy many delicacies.  Nagoya is not a particularly interesting for those visiting other cities but it is famous for its castle, local deep fried delicacies, chicken wings, and Toyota.  Toyota has their main factories located just outside Nagoya with a large museum as well.  Nagoya is also one of the most popular cities for people wishing to see races at the nearby Suzuka Circuit, but the circuit is located in Kansai, not Chubu.

Note:  Due to the amount of information available, this is only part 1 of 2.  Part 2 will be posted next week.

Regions of Japan Information:

Wikipedia:
Japan:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_regions_of_Japan
Hokkaido:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokkaid%C5%8D_Prefecture
Tohoku:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%8Dhoku_region
Kanto:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kant%C5%8D_region
Chubu:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C5%ABbu_region
Hokuriku:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokuriku_region
Koshinetsu:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C5%8Dshin%27etsu_region
Tokai:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%8Dkai_region

Japan Guide:  http://www.japan-guide.com/list/e1001.html

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Kobe April 26, 2011

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kansai, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Kobe” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/s2liAm-kobe

 

Kobe is a quaint suburban city that is akin to the relationship of Yokohama to Tokyo.  It is a major city in the Kansai region and less than an hour away from Osaka.  It is steeped in history but appears to suffer a little in the sense that they are always trying to step out of Osaka’s shadow.  Realistically, Kobe is a city that could never rival Osaka.  It is no different than asking a suburban city to be more popular than the nearby big brother.  Kyoto and Nara have a similar relationship.  Everyone talks about Kyoto and how great it is, yet many people overlook Nara.  They are both very similar and yet they are also very different at the same time.  Kobe and Osaka are similar in this respect.  Osaka has grown into a very modern large city that appears to be leaving all of its history in the past.  Kobe however seems to be embracing their past and expanding with the future.

There is no better way to experience the past of Kobe than to explore the Kitano area.  This is a small area that houses various old consulates.  It is situated on at the bottom of a hill near Shin-Kobe station.  Walking around the small streets in this area can make you feel as if you stepped back in time a little to when the Europeans were settling in the area and doing a lot of trade.  Today, the small streets can be a little dangerous as affluent Japanese drivers zoom past you in their Mercedes Benz cars.  The old European style homes can be visited for a fee in some cases, but the exteriors are very quaint.  It has a very relaxing nature that makes you wish there was a nice coffee shop with a terrace so you can enjoy some afternoon tea in the sun.  Kobe also feels a bit like a wedding capital of Japan.  I cannot confirm this but the number of wedding chapels I saw in Kobe was astonishing.  The Kitano area is no exception.  There are several wedding chapels and halls in the area that will help you hold a traditional western wedding.  The Kitano area is also a great starting point to do some hiking in the mountains that border Kobe.  The views from the mountains are considered to be some of the best in Japan as evidenced by Mt. Rokko.  Away from the Kitano area is a ropeway that brings you up to the top of Mt. Rokko which is reported to be one of the top 3 night views of Japan; the other two being in Nagasaki and Hakodate.  Unfortunately on my trip I didn’t get a chance to visit the mountain peak.

Central Kobe can be described as an area around Sannomiya Station.  While Kobe Station is not located in this area, Sannomiya is the heart of Kobe.  All around Sannomiya you will find various department stores.  Almost all train lines in and around Kobe run through Sannomiya.  All of the major department stores are represented in this area as well as a large and long shopping arcade that runs from Sannomiya out to the western suburbs.  It is also the centre of all drinking to be done in Kobe.  It can be difficult to get around with so many people in the area but it is a wonderfully busy place.  At the main intersection, you can see all kinds of people.  I would liken it to Shibuya Crossing or the east side of Shinjuku.  You can see various musicians playing their music and trying break into the industry.  You can also see various people looking for donations to various charities.  Flower road is also a famous street that passes through Sannomiya.  Flower road is a road that stretches from Shin-Kobe Station all the way to the harbour.  It is a nice wide road that is lined with various flower boxes and statues.  The statues can be a bit surprising for a country such as Japan since most of the statues depict naked women.  Most people ignore them but for me it was a surprise.  They aren’t in any sexual positions but for such a conservative country, I was nonetheless surprised.  Towards the end of Sannomiya is Kobe’s Chinatown.  Officially called Nankinmachi (after Nanjing), it is your typical Chinatown.  I actually enjoyed this one the most out of the 3 main Chinatown areas in Japan.  Yokohama is the largest but it is also too busy and doesn’t feel real.  Nagasaki is too small and it doesn’t feel as welcoming as Kobe.  Nankinmachi is very open and very friendly.  You will see many buskers selling various foods as well as many restaurants lining the area.  You can’t go around the area without filling your stomach and the smells will keep you there.

The port area is the last place I visited in Kobe.  It is a wide area that has a lot of reminders of the past Great Hanshin Earthquake.  On one end you have Mosaic and Harbourland.  Mosaic is a modern shopping complex that is similar to the shopping complexes in Odaiba.  It is an open air area with many small shops alongside some brand name shops.  It is a place for couples to go and enjoy a date.  It is teaming with young couples but on weekdays when everyone is working or at school, it can feel a bit like a ghost town.  Harbourland is adjacent to Mosaic.  It is a small urban amusement park where you can ride various amusement rides such as small roller coasters and Ferris Wheels.  Across from this area is Meriken Park.  This is a large open park that houses the Kobe Maritime Museum, the Kawasaki Good Times World, and the Kobe Port Tower.  The museum and Good Times World are in the same building and showcase the history of the Port of Kobe as well as showcasing the technology of Kawasaki.  Kobe Port Tower is an icon of Kobe.  It is a tall red tower that looks similar to a baton.  It is usually lit up at night but on my visit to Kobe they turned off the exterior lighting in order to conserve energy.  The park itself is also used for Christmas light displays each year.  While the museum and tower are interesting, the earthquake memorial is more fascinating.  At the memorial you can read about the effects of the Great Hanshin Earthquake as well as see a small section of the port that was destroyed and left as is after the quake.  It was a little ironic that I would visit this section as I was taking a spontaneous vacation to escape the aftershocks from the Great Eastern Japan Earthquake.  If being on solid land is starting to get boring you can also take a boat cruise that leaves from a section between Meriken Park and Mosaic.  The ships embark on cruises that take you around Kobe harbour, the Akashi Bridge, or even to Kobe Airport where you can watch the planes land.  One of the ships has been designed to look like a gaudy pirate ship that came straight out of a Chinese “Disneyland”.  It looked cheap and a bit fake looking.  It looked like a lot of fun for kids but for most adults it was probably something we wouldn’t care much for.

If you head east of Meriken Park you will walk along a highway where you’ll be able to see a bit more of the earthquake history.  Minatonomori Park is located in an evacuation centre that is literally nestled between elevated highways.  It is a large open park that is popular for doing sports.  There is a skate park for inline skaters as well as skateboarders.  You can find a small hockey rink, no ice of course, as well as tennis courts and a small soccer pitch.  There is a large field for you to just relax as well.  Inside the park is a small monument where an old clock is preserved.  It marks the moment that the earthquake struck.  It is somewhat sombre but the activities in the park keep the atmosphere light.  Across the way is another park that has yet another monument to the great earthquake.  This monument is more hopeful as there is an eternal flame that was lit with flames gathered from all neighbourhoods that were affected by the earthquake.  It is a very interesting concept and something that should be repeated in the future.  For those who have even more time, heading south of this region on the Port Liner will take you to Port Island.  On Port Island, you can enjoy various cultural activities.  There are several different museums to visit however the cost to access the area may make people think twice.  I didn’t get a chance to visit Port Island but I’d like to try on a future trip to Kobe.

Overall, Kobe is a wonderful city to visit.  There isn’t a lot to do but if you take your time and just relax, you will have a lot of fun.  It isn’t a city where you can rush and enjoy everything.  While it can be visited in a day to get a general feel of the area, I do recommend a couple days to just enjoy everything.  For an average tourist, however, I doubt it would be very interesting.  For residents of Japan it’s a wonderful place to get away from the big city and yet keep all of the conveniences of a big city.

Kobe Information

Official Tourism Website:  http://www.feel-kobe.jp/_en/
Japan Guide:  http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e2159.html
Wikitravel:  http://wikitravel.org/en/Kobe

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Kyoto – Kiyomizudera February 8, 2011

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kansai, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Kyoto – Kiyomizudera” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-BV

Kiyomizudera is one of the most famous temples in Kyoto. Of course, to be one of the most famous temples in Kyoto doesn’t mean as much as it does in Tokyo as there are so many famous temples in Kyoto . This one is of special importance due to its history and the fact that it is included in the UNESCO World Heritage Sites list for Kyoto. The temple itself is located on a mountainside with spectacular views of the surrounding area. It is almost always listed on travel guides as a must see temple and I would highly recommend it.

The first step to visiting this temple is to actually reach the temple. The easiest way to get there is to take a bus. From the bus stop, you still have to hike nearly 1km to get to the main entrance of the temple complex. This can be a difficult hike for those who have never exercised in their life, but when visiting Japan, it’s always safe to assume that you will be doing a lot of walking. The main street and bus stop is located at the very bottom of the hill yet the entire hike up is still enjoyable. After one or two blocks, you start to see all of the typical tourist shops that would line a major street towards any tourist attraction.  Due to the popularity and history of Kiyiomisudera, many of these shops have been around for decades, if not centuries. You will be able to see various shops selling locally made arts and crafts and dozens of food shops. All of the shops sell regional items and they shouldn’t be missed. If you are looking for a full meal, you may want to skip this area as the costs can be high, but if you are looking for cookies, crackers, or something in that range, you can’t really go wrong buying things here. On almost any day you visit, you will be fighting a steady stream of people heading both up and down the hill. If you go on a weekday, there is a high chance you will see hundreds of school kids making their way up and down, whereas if you are going on the weekend, you will see just about anyone. This can be a challenge if you are pressed for time and it only gets worse as you get closer to the top. Once you reach the temple entrance will you get some room to move around freely.

Upon entering the shrine, after paying the entrance fee, you have a short walk past various buildings till you reach the main hall. In terms of a private tour, most people make a B-line to the main hall as it is the main reason people visit Kiyomizudera.  In reality, there are lots of things to see along the way if you are patient enough and if it’s your first visit to a temple.  For those who have visited many other temples around Japan, there aren’t many unique features in this area, but there are a few. The main hall is located 13 metres above the ground near the exit and has beautiful views of the surrounding area. Inside the hall itself is a large open space that is designed in a very classical Japanese Buddhist style. It’s difficult to explain but it’s something that must be experience and seen by oneself. The entire hall is not open to the public but a fairly large area is. The main attraction has to be the outer walk/stage which is where you can enjoy the beautiful views. In the spring, you can enjoy the wonderful cherry blossoms and in the autumn, the autumn foliage is a wonderful sight. You can enjoy all of these at night as well as the temple regularly installs lighting so that the views can be enjoyed nearly 24 hours a day. Of course the temple is closed at night, but during certain times of the year, they open later so people can enjoy the beauty of the forest below.  On my own personal visit, it was pouring down which added a unique feature of allowing me to see how the water ducts work at clearing water from the roof.  Seeing a torrent of water stream down from the corner of the roof was amazing but you need a lot of rain to do that.

There is a small shrine located just behind the main hall itself and is part of the main self guided tour. There are steps that lead up to the Jishu shrine. This is a “love” shrine where you can pray that you will find your one true love. There are two stones set 18 metres apart. If you can find your way between the two stones without looking, you will find love on your own. If you need help, you will need someone to help you find your true love. On the various English websites that I have visited, they mention that you only have to do this one way, however on the Japanese inscription, I believe they said you have to return to the rock you started from. I’m not entirely sure but it doesn’t hurt to do it. The more interesting part of this shrine is the fact that they have a large statue of a rabbit/hare. The old story is that Okuninushi, the god whom the shrine is dedicaqted to, wanted to marry a beautiful princess and was on his way to court her, but a hare stopped him and asked for help. He was with his brothers who also wanted to court the princess but they didn’t offer good advice. Since Okuninushi helped the hare and the hare happened to be a god, the hare said he would be the one who would be able to marry the princess. The story goes on from there, but it is not relevant to enjoy the shrine. Needless to say, the hare itself is a bit scary and nothing a young child would enjoy.

The temple grounds themselves are large and I didn’t get to see everything. I took the main tour as that was all the time I had to see. There is one last point of interest within the temple grounds itself. This is the Otowa Waterfalls. There are three streams of water that fall from above and you are given a ladle with a long handle. The streams of water represent wisdom, health, and longevity. If you drink from the proper stream, you will increase one of those three traits. It is a custom to drink from one or two of the three, at the most, as drinking from all three is considered greedy and can create misfortune instead. It is common to see very long lines outside of this attraction and you will have to wait anywhere from 10-30 minutes just to reach the streams. For some people, this is well worth the wait, but I’m pretty impatient when it comes to lines and decided to skip it. I don’t feel I need to improve anything specifically, but if you want to have a little fun it is enjoyable and free with admission to the temple grounds.

The temple grounds were a big surprise for me. When I visited, it was raining pretty hard at first which made things a little difficult to get around. Nevertheless it was beautiful and a place that I recommend, even with the hundreds of people walking around. It’s difficult to get a good picture of the area and I recommend patience. If you expect to feel relaxed with a sense of enlightenment, you might be disappointed as there are generally too many people to make this peaceful. However, the views and intricate detail of this typical temple is well worth the visit. There is a good reason all of the guide books include it as a must see destination when visiting Kyoto.

Kyoto – Kiyomizudera is part of a Kyoto series.  Please follow the links below to read more about Kyoto:

Kiyomizudera Information:

Kiyomizudera (Wikipedia): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kiyomizu-dera
Kiyomizudera (Japan Guide): http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e3901.html
Okuninushi (Wikipedia): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%C5%8Ckuninushi

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

The Great Motorcycle Adventure – Part II (Wrap Up) September 1, 2009

Posted by Dru in Japan, Shikoku, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “The Great Motorcycle Adventure – Part II (Wrap Up)” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-eP

By now, you have finished reading about Shikoku and you know what to expect if you visit Shikoku.  In this post, I’m going to be a little greedy and talk about my adventure, personally.

Preparing for this adventure was a chore in itself.  There are a million things to do, and a million things to plan.  I purposefully left everything till the last few weeks, but kept a basic plan in my head.  I never even had a good idea of how long I’d like to stay in each area until a week before leaving.  In fact, I never even locked my plans on how to get to Shikoku until the last second, literally.  I decided to take the ferry, roughly two nights before I left, and didn’t even reserve a spot until the day I left.  There are two main reasons why I chose to take the ferry.  The first, I didn’t feel like riding for 8 hours on the expressway, getting lost, looking for gas, and generally being bored on my own.  The main reason I took the ferry was that a friend of mine was also heading to Shikoku at the same time.  Instead of driving, or riding a motorcycle, he and a friend of his decided to ride their bicycles from Kochi to Matsuyama.  It was also a great adventure, and I felt honoured to be starting our journey together.  In fact, we almost didn’t even start together.  They barely made it onto the ferry as they were late arriving at the terminal.  On the ferry, I also met a German man who was on a trip to Kyushu.  It takes roughly two days to reach Kyushu, but we had a great time drinking, eating, and talking.  I believe I made the right decision.

My friend, John, has his own podcast.  You can view it here:  http://weblish.net/
Please subscribe to his main Weblish Podcast (Episode 40 a~f) to see his own documentary of his trip in Shikoku.

Upon riding down the ramp at Tokushima, I had to wait roughly 20 minutes for my friend to arrive.  He had to get gas, and he also got lost looking for the terminal.  I was getting antsy to get out as it was a beautiful day and I was hoping to head up to Naruto for the whirlpools.  As we were looking for the hotel, we had a little accident.  My friend dropped his motorcycle.  This was our only bad luck, in terms of riding.  It took us about 30 minutes to find the hotel, but when we did, we were just happy to be in Shikoku.  My friend, however, had no energy and needed to get off the bike for the day.  This would actually be the mood of the entire trip.  Ride a little, and then relax for the afternoon and night.  We toured Tokushima before going to bed.  The hotel was great, and I wish I could have gone back.  The owner had a big Ducati in the garage, free motorcycle parking, and free wifi in our room.  What more could we ask for?  He even gave us a little advice when we left for our trip.  Unfortunately, when we returned to Tokushima, the hotel was fully booked.

Riding down route 55 was excellent.  It was our first full day, and like any other adventure, we got lost.  The first time we got lost was when the road just stopped.  They were still building a bypass.  Thankfully, we needed the break anyways and it was relatively easy to get back on route.  We got to see pretty much everything I wanted to see, in terms of sights.  We saw a dam, the beach, and the cape.  It was a beautiful road and I wish I could go back again, someday.  I’m not finished with Muroto.  I only wish I had an extra 10 hours to enjoy some of the sights that we passed, especially the beaches.

Kochi was our first rest day.  Since we don’t ride much, it was a good opportunity to keep our batteries full.  We had a great time walking around and seeing all of the people.  My only regret is not bringing flip flops to walk around in.  It was only the third day and my feet were already starting to hurt from walking in motorcycle boots.  This was also the day that we decided to not use our motorcycles aside from getting from A to B, as we didn’t want to look for parking, and risk getting lost.  It is way too easy to get lost, especially without a navigation system.  We did have a map, but it was for the entire region, so it wasn’t detailed enough for us, wherever we went.  If I lived in the area, I would definitely want to explore the area a lot more.

Our next leg of the trip took us from Kochi to Ozu.  We had a tough time finding a hotel as we were in the middle of Golden Week.  We were lucky to find a room in a town we wanted to stay in.  We thought about taking route 56 all the way to the second cape, but thought we had better skip it as we took too much time taking route 55.  We also started our adventure on the expressway for the first time.  I can’t tell you how much time you can save if you take the expressway.  People go much faster, and there are very few cars.  It’s expensive overall, but well worth it, even for short distances.  We cut through the middle of the cape to reach Uwajima.  We had several plans for the day as we didn’t know how long it would take us to reach Ozu.  We decided that taking a junction to Uwajima, first, and then heading north to Ozu would be better as we had a lot of time.  We got lost in Uwajima, but that was to be expected.  We were more lost when we were in Ozu.  We saw a beautiful European style castle or palace on the side of the mountain, but we didn’t have time to go looking for it.  We both thoroughly enjoyed Ozu.  It was the kind of small town Japan that you can only dream of.  It wasn’t very small, but small enough that you can walk everywhere.  The town had a train running through every hour or so, the shops closed very early, and there really wasn’t a lot to do except enjoy the scenery.  It was extremely peaceful.

Our final touring leg was to head out to Misaki and then head to Matsuyama.  This was probably the biggest disappointment of the trip for me.  Misaki turned out to be nothing special.  It was a nice challenge, but the area wasn’t that beautiful.  It could have been all the clouds, but I’m not too sure.  I enjoyed the coast from Ozu to Matsuyama, and loved the beach at Futami.  I hope to return someday and just spend a few hours relaxing.  We spent a little too much time there, and we were very anxious about Matsuyama.  Being the height of Golden Week, we had no place to stay, and we might have to find an internet café or something.  Thankfully, we found the Matsuyama Guest House, with an excellent host.  We met many great people and had the time of our lives.  I can’t say how greatful I was for staying there.  My only problem was the two men we shared a room with.  They were Americans who were hiking along the 88 temple route.  Matsuyama was their last stop before returning to Tokyo for work.  I can’t describe the stench that they and their clothes produced, but needless to say, I didn’t sleep well.  I got up early the next morning and went for a walk on my own to collect my thoughts.  It was about the time that my friend and I were starting to feel a strain on our relationship.  There is only so much two people can do together before they start to get upset at each other.  They can be the best friends in the world, but unless you live with them for a long time, it can be difficult.  Matsuyama itself was a great place, but not a place that I would want to visit again.  I came, I saw, I left.  I wish I went to the Dogo Onsen, and I would love to visit the Dogo Brewery again, but in reality, there isn’t much for me to see or do anymore.

After Matsuyama, we had to decide whether to risk heading to Takamatsu, with a chance of showers, or stay another day in Matsuyama.  We decided to risk it as the chances were low.  We weren’t so lucky this day.  We had a small shower on the expressway, and another one when we got in to Takamatsu city itself.  It took us a little while to find our way to the hotel, but overall, everything was fine.  We had a free computer in the hotel, and they even covered our bikes so it wouldn’t get too dirty from the rain.  The hotel was run by an older couple, like a family business, but it was part of a small franchise.  We were thinking of heading to Kotohira before getting to Takamatsu, but we changed our plans when we saw the weather forecast for the day, and also when we thought about parking.  We also made our first big mistake of the day.  We tried to take a train, but misread the timetable.  Instead of having an extra train on holidays, it said there was NO train on the holidays.  We had to wait at the station for over one hour.  We could have walked back, but in our motorcycle boots, probably not.  We also didn’t know about bicycle rentals, which would have helped us a lot, but that’s for our next trip.

We used Takamatsu as our base for three nights.  We spent a day in Kotohira and a day in Naoshima.  There isn’t much to say or add as my previous posts describe it much better.  My only regret was that it was raining so much in Naoshima that I didn’t get a chance to ride a bicycle on the island.  I will definitely have to return for that adventure.  At the time, I didn’t know about an island called Shodoshima.  It is another famous island that is close to Naoshima.  It is famous for being the olive capital of Japan, and known for a replica 88 temple pilgrimage.  Thankfully, I can also reach this island from Okayama, which is a place I’m considering to visit.  Okayama is famous for its black castle.  It was built to rival Himeji castle.  It would make a nice long weekend trip, if I get a chance.  If I do return to Takamatsu I will definitely have to enjoy the delicious Udon, but for now, I’ll be content with the udon in Tokyo.  Takamatsu is no longer on my list of places to visit.

Upon returning to Tokushima, I finally got to see one of the main things I wanted to see since I started planning my trip.  The Naruto Whirlpools are famous in Japan and I had to see them.  I was a little sad that we didn’t see them when we arrived, but I was still very happy to see them at the end of the trip.  By this time, my friend and I had nothing to really talk about, and we were basically trying to plan the end.  He ended up leaving a day early so he could be with his girlfriend and also go to a food festival in Osaka that was held once every four years, or something like that.  I couldn’t blame him at all.  I would have done the same.  My only problem was that the ferry I wanted to take was fully booked and I didn’t know if I could go home the next day or not.  The day that he left Shikoku, I had a full day to myself and my thoughts in Tokushima.  The city itself is very boring unless you get out.  I didn’t want to do that as I was tired from the travelling and really wanted to go home.  I ended up just walking back and forth in town until my feet gave up.  I had to change hotels as well because the one I stayed in was fully booked that night.  Needless to say, I had a restless night.

The morning of my potential departure from Shikoku was an early one.  I arrived at the ferry terminal very early, about 1 hour before they even opened.  I was the only idiot there that early.  I got my ticket to wait and didn’t even know if I could get on or not.  About one hour before we could board, one of the staff said I had a place, but I couldn’t understand him well enough.  Thankfully, I met a very nice old man, who reminded me of Mr. Miyagi from the Karate Kid (“Best Kid” in Japan).  He was kind enough to help me, just a little.  We did have a nice conversation before boarding the ferry.  The ferry ride home was the same as when I went to Shikoku.  The only difference was that I had my own bunk, and there wasn’t a “restaurant”.  Instead, they only had vending machine food.  It was still good enough.  I ate and drank all day and night until it was time to sleep.  I can’t tell you how different it was to sleep in a bunk versus the floor of a tatami room.  The only problem was that the curtains of the bunk kept all the air in, and I woke up suffocating in my own carbon dioxide.  Arriving in Tokyo, I was greeted by the fresh morning air; it was about 6 am.  I had a nice short ride home where I put my things away and could finally say “tadaima” (I’m home).

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

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