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Gotemba April 3, 2012

Posted by Dru in Chubu, Japan, Kanto, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Gotemba” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/s2liAm-gotemba

Gotemba is a small city located at the foot of Mt. Fuji.  It is surrounded by the towns of Susono and Oyama but most people will consider that entire area to be Gotemba for simplicity.  Gotemba itself is located on the south-east corner of Mt. Fuji on the east side of Shizuoka and at the border of Kanagawa.  It is literally at the border between the Kanto and Chubu regions of Japan.  While Shizuoka is technically within the Chubu region, most consider everything to the east of Mt. Fuji to be part of Kanto and due to the geography, Gotemba falls on the east side of Mt. Fuji.  Gotemba itself has only one major attraction aside from Mt. Fuji, and that’s a large outlet shopping mall.  In the surrounding areas, to the north of Gotemba is the town of Oyama which is famous for Fuji Speedway.  Both of these are the only famous destinations for any travellers to the region, although there are a lot of natural places to visit.

The most famous and obvious attraction in Gotemba has to be Mt. Fuji.  Gotemba is the location for the entrance to the Gotemba hiking trail.  This is probably only for the real adventurists as it is considered the most difficult way to hike up Mt. Fuji as it is the longest trail.  Due to the proximity of Gotemba to Mt. Fuji, you can usually see Mt. Fuji on most clear days.  Mt. Fuji is a very fickle mountain.  I have heard many people complain about the problems of heading out to the foot of Mt. Fuji only to be greeted by clouds instead of the majestic mountain.  Due to its isolation from other mountain ranges and its height Mt. Fuji is often obscured by clouds.  In order to see Mt. Fuji, you need to go there on a perfectly clear day.  If there are any clouds in the sky, it is highly likely that they will slam into Mt. Fuji and hang out for a while leading to a huge disappointment.  Gotemba is one of the few places you can visit and not feel too bad if Mt. Fuji is obscured.  Most people visit Hakone, and I actually recommend visiting Hakone over Gotemba, but it can be harder to see Mt. Fuji as Hakone is located in the nearby mountains which can make seeing Mt. Fuji a little harder.  Kawaguchiko is the other famous place to see Mt. Fuji but aside from FujiQ Highlands, an amusement park, there is nothing to do there.  Gotemba can be better but only if you enjoy shopping.

Currently, Gotemba is well known for its shopping opportunities.  If you tell anyone in Tokyo that you are going to visit Gotemba, almost everyone will ask if you will be going there to go shopping.  The outlet mall in Gotemba is called Premium Outlets and it is an American brand of outlet malls run by the Simon Property Group.  In Japan, they set up a joint venture with Mitsubishi Estate who operates the Premium Outlet Mall chain in Japan.  The Gotemba branch is the flagship mall in Japan and well known among people in Tokyo.  It is a destination for people with long lines to get into the mall on weekends and holidays.  The easiest way into the mall is to purchase a ticket on one of the special direct buses.  These buses run from Shinjuku and Tokyo Station.  They leave in the morning and return by dinner.  All you have to do is show up at the station, board the bus and then board the same bus to return back to Tokyo.  Tickets for the weekend do sell out quickly so it is best to reserve seats ahead of time.  For those who can’t get tickets, you can still easily take a regular highway bus.  A highway bus is a long distance bus that uses highways to get from A to B, but on the way to Gotemba there are several bus stops on the Expressway itself.  There is also a train service but the best option for this is via Shinjuku but it is more expensive than the bus.  For most people, shopping at Gotemba will not be very different to shopping at any other outlet shop in the world.  Most of the shops are the same as in America, but there are several Japanese brands that you can’t find elsewhere.  Depending on your own fashion sense, you may or may not enjoy shopping in Gotemba but if you enjoy shopping anyways, you can always spend a day visiting Gotemba and attempting to see Mt. Fuji up close at the same time.

To the north of Gotemba is Oyama, the home of Fuji Speedway.  Fuji Speedway is the most famous race course in the Kanto region.  It was host to the F1 Japan Grand Prix in the past and considered the most beautiful race course in Japan.  This is mostly due to the fact that you can easily see Mt. Fuji from the track.  Today, the track is used mostly for local racing championships and Toyota sponsored events.  The track itself has undergone several changes over the decades.  Due to financial difficulties by its owner, Toyota, the track was discontinued as an F1 circuit but continues to be used for national races and local events.  Unfortunately, it appears that the racing course will not be used as an F1 circuit in the foreseeable future.  It is a bit of a shame but when compared to Suzuka’s greater history, Fuji Speedway will probably continue to suffer from the lack of attention.

As I mentioned in the beginning, Gotemba is not a place most people will ever visit, nor will they really want to.  It is a beautiful place to go but compared to the more popular areas such as Hakone, Gotemba will be overlooked a lot.  For nature, people will visit Hakone.  For Mt. Fuji hikes, people will go to Kawaguchiko.  For shopping, most tourists will stay in Tokyo or visit one of the outlet malls that are easier to visit such as the Mitsui chain in Makuhari.  For locals and people living in Tokyo, Gotemba will be a place to visit once in a while.  If you can justify a visit to the region, I recommend doing so, but unfortunately, I doubt most will want to spend the time to go there.

Note:  Unfortunately I have no photos of Gotemba Premium Outlets.  I almost never go there to take pictures, only to do shopping.  🙂

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Regions of Japan – Nagoya to Hokkaido June 7, 2011

Posted by Dru in Chubu, Hokkaido, Japan, Kanto, Tohoku, Tokyo, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Regions of Japan – Nagoya to Hokkaido” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-EX

 

Japan is a small country that happens to be very long.  From end to end, Japan is well over 1000km long.  It is larger than Germany in terms of land mass and has a very diverse ecosystem.  You have the cold snowy north and the sub-tropical south.  It is a common misconception that Japan is a small country.  I would also argue that many people feel that any country that is outside of their own region is small, especially for Americans and Canadians.  It is important to know that Japan, while small overall, is actually very long which helps create the illusion that it is small.

Japan is divided into 8 main regions with a few sub-regions.  In the north is Hokkaido.  I have written a lot about Sapporo and the various festivals there.  It is a winter wonderland and also a great summer getaway.  In the winter, people head up there for skiing and to enjoy the delicious seafood.  In the summer, the seafood is still around but people go to escape the heat and humidity of the south.  Compared to other regions in Japan, Hokkaido is a relatively stable and sparsely populated region.  It isn’t the “wild west” but it isn’t like Tokyo either.  Getting from point A to point B in Hokkaido can be very difficult due to the sheer distances between cities and towns and the lack of trains can make it a difficult task.  Renting a car is definitely recommended if you want to see the local areas such as Shiretoko but it isn’t a necessity.  The bus network between cities is pretty good and you can get from Sapporo to most cities in Hokkaido by bus.  Planes are not so popular and trains are good for the major cities.  Unfortunately the trains can take a long time to get from place to place but keeping on the main belt from Asahikawa to Sapporo, then down to Hakodate via either Chitose or Niseko is relatively easy.  Be prepared for long travel times and you will have a good time.

Tohoku is the northern section of Honshu, the main island of Japan.  The main island forms an ‘L’ shape and Tohoku is at the top of the ‘L’.  It is a region that is very similar to Hokkaido yet also very temperate in nature.  The most common starting point is Sendai.  Including Sendai, all points north are considered Tohoku.  Points below Sendai are generally Tohoku as well but places such as part of Fukushima can be considered part of the Kanto plains.  Honshu itself is a very mountainous area with mountains bisecting the entire island into the Pacific and Sea of Japan side.  This creates a very distinct feel in each city depending on which coast you are on.  On the Pacific, the winters can be cold but there isn’t a lot of snow.  The Sea of Japan side which includes Akita and Yamagata receive a lot of snow in the winter.  In the summer, this area is more pleasant but the southern regions can be pretty hot and humid.  It is literally a transition between Hokkaido and the temperate south.  There are many local delicacies such as the Aomori apples and the beef tongue of Sendai.  It isn’t a popular place for tourists as there aren’t many things to see and do compared to other regions.  Hokkaido is well known for seafood and snow, but Tohoku doesn’t have a major drawing point for tourists.

Kanto is the centre of Japan.  It is a small section of Japan that includes Tokyo and located at the bend of the ‘L’ of Honshu.  It is where almost everyone goes when they visit Japan and it is a pretty small area.  The entire Kanto region can be considered as Greater Tokyo as many people do commute from the edges of Kanto to get into Tokyo.  Some would argue that there are major cities and industries as well such as Yokohama but the shear size of Tokyo makes Yokohama feel like a twin city similar to the twin cities in Minnesota.  Of course this is not the same however the idea that both cities can be considered the same city, rather twin cities, is true.  There isn’t really much to say or add to this region as most people know about the Kanto region already.  It is the heart of Japan.  Most companies and most people live in this area.  There are not a lot of historical places to visit anymore but places such as Nikko, Kamakura, and Hakone are excellent places with their own unique feel.

Chubu is a very complex region.  There are several sub-regions to Chubu due to its geography.  It is a region that is bound by Mt. Fuji, bordering the north-western area of Kanto and extending west to Kyoto.  It is also one of the most “visited” regions in Japan yet most people never stop to enjoy the region.  I am also a victim of just passing through the region more times than not.  Most people will go up to Mt. Fuji or pass through on their way to Kyoto.  The few people who do go to the Chubu region will usually head off to Niigata and Nagano or do a little business in Nagoya.  Due to the geography of the area is further subdivided into 3 regions.  The lesser known is the Koshinetsu region that encompasses Nagano, Niigata, and Yamanashi.  This area is well known for its snow and excellent onsen however the use of the name Koshinetsu is not popular.  They are more commonly known by their own respective prefectures.  The Hokuriku region is an area on the Sea of Japan side that is bordered by Niigata and Kyoto.  It is considered a northern path to reach Kansai but it is often overlooked by people.  It is still a somewhat remote area that is easily accessible by plane.  Trains do travel to the region but the new Hokuriku Shinkansen isn’t expected to be finished for a long time.  The main sections allowing access from Tokyo to the heart of Hokuriku will be complete in 2014 but the final section to Osaka has yet to be finalized.  As it stands, this area is often overlooked due to its remoteness.  The Tokai region is the most famous region as it is the main route for the Tokaido Shinkansen that links Tokyo to Osaka.  Shizuoka is one of the biggest prefectures in Japan yet very few people will visit it.  The most famous area is Nagoya where you can enjoy many delicacies.  Nagoya is not a particularly interesting for those visiting other cities but it is famous for its castle, local deep fried delicacies, chicken wings, and Toyota.  Toyota has their main factories located just outside Nagoya with a large museum as well.  Nagoya is also one of the most popular cities for people wishing to see races at the nearby Suzuka Circuit, but the circuit is located in Kansai, not Chubu.

Note:  Due to the amount of information available, this is only part 1 of 2.  Part 2 will be posted next week.

Regions of Japan Information:

Wikipedia:
Japan:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_regions_of_Japan
Hokkaido:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokkaid%C5%8D_Prefecture
Tohoku:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%8Dhoku_region
Kanto:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kant%C5%8D_region
Chubu:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ch%C5%ABbu_region
Hokuriku:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hokuriku_region
Koshinetsu:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C5%8Dshin%27etsu_region
Tokai:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T%C5%8Dkai_region

Japan Guide:  http://www.japan-guide.com/list/e1001.html

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Hakone (Part II) February 2, 2010

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Hakone (Part II)” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-jf

If you have the energy to continue into Hakone, you’ll have to travel a bit farther than Souzan.  Most of the activities around Hakone are centred in the area between Hakone Yumoto and Souzan.  From there, you can venture out past Souzan on a cable car and head out towards Lake Ashi.  This is probably where you’ll get the best views of the countryside of Japan, if that’s what you are looking for.  Do be aware that if it’s even slightly cloudy, you won’t get the best view of Hakone.  The most famous view is from Lake Ashi where, on a clear day, you can see Mt. Fuji.

Souzan is the starting point of the gondola that will take you to Owakudani, and then off to Lake Ashi.  Owakudani is generally translated into great boiling valley, or hell’s valley.  It’s an active volcano that is constantly emitting sulphur.  Be aware that you’ll be near the top of the mountain, so the weather will be cooler and because of the sulphur, it will be very smelly.  There is pretty much only one major route to follow.  Head with most of the people and look for signs and maps.  It can be a little difficult to get around, but once you are on the path, it’s pretty easy.  The people who work at Owakudani are careful about the amount of sulphur in the air and will advise you to make your way down if it’s too dangerous.  When you do get to the end of the hiking trail, there is a large boiling pool that is too hot to swim in.  It’s nice for pictures, but the main point of the journey is to buy eggs.  When at the top, you can buy the freshest boiled eggs in the area.  The eggs are boiled in the boiling sulphur water, which actually makes the shells black.  The inside of the egg is still natural, and the taste is normal, but the shell is black and a little brittle.  The main selling point is that each egg you eat can add around 5 years to your life.  This can be a lot if you are desperate.  The trip out to Owakudani is something that isn’t necessary, but if you are interested in seeing new things, and experiencing Japanese travel culture, you should head here.  The other reason to stop off at Owakudani is the ticket to get to Lake Ashi requires a transfer at Owakudani, so you might as well stretch your legs and enjoy the smell of sulphur.

Lake Ashi, as I mentioned, is probably the most famous place in Hakone, yet one of the hardest places to get to.  If you only want to go to Lake Ashi, you might be better off taking one of the highway busses out there.  From Owakudani, you can take the second extension of the cable car to Lake Ashi.  Do be aware that on major holidays, this area is also very busy and not easy to get around quickly.  Once at Togendai station, it’s necessary to transfer to one of the sightseeing boats.  During the high season, there are many boats trolling the lake.  These have been called gaudy and I can imagine why.  From the pictures, they are nothing but elaborate pirate ships that look like they were stolen from Disneyland.  It does look like a very interesting ship to travel on and I’m sure the views from the ship are beautiful.  There are only two stops, other than Togendai, for the Hakone Sightseeing Ships.  It is Moto-Hakone and Hakonemachi.  Both are equally important from what I’ve heard.

At Hakonemachi, you’ll be within the old town of Hakone.  Here, you can see some of the most historical buildings in Kanto, the greater Tokyo region.  From here to Moto-Hakone, the old Tokaido Road heads into Tokyo.  The old Tokaido Road is a historical road that was the only road in and out of Tokyo, heading west.  In Hakonemachi, you can visit the Hakone Checkpoint.  The Hakone Checkpoint is where all travellers, Japanese and foreign, had to check in to ensure they were allowed to travel within the country.  Walking to Moto-Hakone is something that has been recommended.  Along the way, you can walk down a path of cedars and once at Moto-Hakone, you can visit the Hakone Shrine.  Taking the ship to Moto-Hakone would also be special as it’s a famous place for pictures.  One of the torii, gate, is placed at the edge of the water making it a beautiful sight in the day.  If you are adventurous enough, you can continue along the Tokaido road for about an hour or so.  You’ll be able to read a small tea house and museum, as well as see some of the original unpaved road.  Do note that the road is nothing more than a walking path.

If you have two days, there are a lot of things to see and do in Hakone.  If you only have one day, it’s a little difficult, but you can get all of the main places.  If you are looking for nature and scenery, I’d recommend heading out to Lake Ashi first as it’s a little difficult to get there.  Do be aware that I have never been there so most of my descriptions are from what I’ve read on other websites.  I am also unsure as to the timing of reaching Lake Ashi itself.  Owakudani, however, is a very quick stop, so it shouldn’t take too long.   Hakone is so popular amongst Japanese people, that there are several ways to get there.  By and far, the easiest has to be by train.  All you have to do is spend a little extra to make it easy.  Going by bus is also simple.  If you are going to only one stop or overnight at an onsen, this would also be viable.  Do note that you will have to be careful of the traffic.  It can take two or three times longer to get back to Tokyo due to traffic on the expressways.  Finally, you can drive yourself.  If you have a total of four people going, this could be a lot cheaper.  Parking in Hakone isn’t difficult and with modern navigation systems, you can easily find parking.  Either way, have fun.

This is part two of a two part series.  To read more about Hakone, head back to Part I.

Note: I didn’t have enough time to head to most places mentioned in this post.  I have added pictures of the Hakone Open Air Museum to fill the space.

Hakone Information:

Hakone (Japan Guide):  http://www.japan-guide.com/e/e5200.html
Hakone (Wikitravel):  http://wikitravel.org/en/Hakone
Hakone (Hakone Navi):  http://www.hakonenavi.jp/english/
Odakyu Hakone Free Pass (Travel Information):  http://www.odakyu.jp/english/freepass/hakone_01.html
Hakone Open Air Museum:  http://www.hakone-oam.or.jp/english/index.html
Yunesson Spa:  http://www.yunessun.com/english/
Fujiya Hotel:  http://www.fujiyahotel.jp/english/index.html
The Little Prince Museum in Hakone: http://www.tbs.co.jp/l-prince/en/

Takamatsu August 4, 2009

Posted by Dru in Japan, Shikoku, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Takamatsu” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-dc

Takamatsu is considered to be the largest city in Shikoku, at least for its city core.  It is also the head of the Shikoku government offices and the heart of business in Shikoku.  Upon entering the city, you will realize how different it is from other parts of Shikoku.  It is a vibrant city that relies a lot on business to keep it running.  Being part of the Kagawa region of the island also means it is the home of the best udon in Japan.  While the city is fairly large, it isn’t what most tourists would call, interesting, unlike Matsuyama.

There are only two things to really see in Takamatsu, Ritsurin Koen and the Tamamo Breakwater.  Ritsurin Koen is a Japanese style park that is also national treasure.  It is located about two kilometres from Takamatsu station.  The park itself is fairly large.  It can be a little difficult to find your way and to see everything quickly.  There is an old small tea house located near a red cliff.  This tea house is only for viewing as it is no longer in use.  The red cliff is probably the most famous image of the park.  While it is called a cliff, it isn’t that large, and follows the edge of the park.  It is modeled after a similar, albeit much larger, cliff in China.  There is also a large tea house located in the centre of the park.  This tea house is very nice and located next to a calm pond.  Unfortunately, like most tea houses in Japan, it was very expensive.  Walking around the park, you can find yourself lining up to climb a bunch of steps to the top of a mound of earth.  This mound is called Mt. Fuji.  It is said to look similar to the real Mt. Fuji at different times.  Unfortunately, I didn’t see it that way, but it is a great place to take panoramic photos of the park.  Lastly, you can also visit the gift shop area where you can buy very expensive bonsai trees, or wood carvings.  If you have ever been to Shinjuku Gyoen in Tokyo, this park will not be that impressive.  It is still a very nice park overall.

Behind the station, you can head straight to the pier where you’ll be able to enjoy a nice walk out to the breakwater.  The Tamamo Breakwater is a pleasant walk and the lighthouse is an amazing sight at night.  Unlike most traditional lighthouses, where only the top shines, the entire lighthouse glows red.  There is also a small park located between the pier and the station buildings.  Within the park, if you arrive at the right season, you can visit a very beautiful rose garden with dozens of rose bushes.  It makes for a very beautiful and relaxing stroll.  If you have the energy, you can also walk over to the Takamatsu-jo and enjoy the beautiful gardens as well.  Unfortunately, the castle was destroyed many years ago, but is scheduled to be rebuilt starting in 2010.  If you can wait a few years, you might be able to enjoy this castle someday.

If you aren’t so interested in sightseeing, Takamatsu is a very bicycle friendly city.  There are several shotengai with various shops in each one.  Takamatsu claims to have the longest shotengai in Japan. If you consider a shotengai to be just one street, then this is not true. If you combine them, and the fact that they are all connected, then this is true. Each shotengai street seems to have its own theme.  I would recommend renting a bicycle at the station before exploring the shotengai.  Unfortunately, I didn’t know about bicycle rentals and went everywhere on foot.  Being in the area of Kagawa, Sanuki Udon is very famous.  You will be able to find udon in almost every corner of the city.  Going to an expensive restaurant is nice, but you can easily find cheap varieties on almost every street. Most of the time, you just order what you want, grab some side dishes, such as tempura, and grab a seat.  You can easily eat for under 500 yen.  When you have nothing better to do, I would recommend heading to one of the udon shops, grab a quick bowl of udon, and chow down.

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Kotohira July 28, 2009

Posted by Dru in Japan, Shikoku, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Kotohira” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/s2liAm-kotohira

Kotohira is a short day trip from Takamatsu.  The town itself is very uneventful with almost nothing to do.  The first thing that I recommend doing is going to the tourist information booth in Takamatsu station and getting a timetable for the trains.  That way, you know when the trains will leave Kotohira station.  There is usually one train per hour.  Upon arriving in Kotohira, you will be greeted with nothing.  Walking out of the station and up the street will take you to one of the main streets in the town.  This street is filled with various shops, vendors, and onsens.  Several people enjoy an overnight stay in an onsen in Kotohira.  I would recommend this as there would be very few people in the area and you might get luck enough to have an onsen almost completely to yourself.

The main purpose of Kotohira is Kompira Shrine.  This is a mountain shrine.  The base of the mountain is where you will see many aggressive shop staff selling you everything they possibly can.  It is very popular to see Buddhist prayer beads, wood carvings, and anything else that can be considered Japanese or religious.  It can be a lot to handle as people might be shouting, enticing people to come in.  This is also the best place to find the easiest way up the mountain.  For roughly 6000 yen, you can pay two men to carry you up to the main shrine.  They can also carry you down if you’d like.  This is usually for old people, but if you feel like throwing money around and you are too lazy to walk, this is a fun way to get to the main shrine.  It also provides an interesting picture to show your friends and family if you are lucky enough to see someone being carried up or down.  Once get past this short entrance area, the rest of the hike will start to get more peaceful.

As you start climbing the steps, you will have to contend with the greatest problem of the mountain, tour groups.  If you are a fast hiker, they will definitely make you slow down, or even stop.  They walk line abreast and block the entire path.  Making your way through these people is a challenge, but generally they stop along the way and let people go.  This can be similar to the rows of tourists climbing Mt. Fuji, but the numbers here are much lower.  After a few minutes of hiking, you will reach the first sign that you are at a shrine.  You will reach a big gate.  This is the official entrance and where things will finally get interesting.  Past the gate, there is a treasure hall.  I have been told that the treasure hall is not special and was to be avoided, so I did avoid it.  The next area is a nice rest area.  It is at the foot of Asahi Shrine.  Unfortunately, you cannot visit Asahi Shrine on the way up, so take a quick picture while you are here.  You can get close up pictures on the way down.  Asahi Shrine was a nice shrine, but as many people say, once you see a shrine, you’ve seen almost all of them.

On the way up to the shrine, you will see a few odd things.  I saw a large bronze ship’s propeller.  I was wondering what this was for until I reached the main shrine.  The main shrine is a nice area.  There is a side courtyard with a path up to the inner shrine and spectacular views of the surrounding area.  The main courtyard is equally beautiful with many people selling various lucky charms.  Off to the side is Ema Hall.  It is a very interesting hall dedicated to the safety of seafarers.  Many pictures of ships and their crew are placed here for luck and safety.  Just past the hall is a very strange set of buildings that is fashioned to look similar to a ship.  Words alone can’t explain it, but it was very odd to see for this area.  It was extremely modern and didn’t blend at all with the old buildings just a few metres away.  However, it is a great place to rest while before you head back down the mountain.

If you still have energy, you can go all the way to the top of the shrine.  The inner shrine is an extra 583 steps from the main shrine.  Reaching the inner shrine is a total of 1368 steps.  The challenge itself is worth the trip, and once you venture past the main shrine, you will notice a significant drop in tourists.  The walk within the forest is very calming and cool, even on a hot spring afternoon.  The views from the inner shrine is not as good as the main shrine, but as I said, it’s a great challenge and it provides a good photo opportunity with a sign telling you how many steps you walked to reach that point.  Thankfully, there are many seats at the inner shrine, so you don’t have worry about finding a place to rest.

Information on Kotohira:
http://wikitravel.org/en/Kotohira
http://www.town.kotohira.kagawa.jp/english/index.html

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

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