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2009 Formula 1 Fuji Television Japanese Grand Prix October 13, 2009

Posted by Dru in Sports.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “2009 Formula 1 Fuji Television Japanese Grand Prix” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-hI

On October 4th, 2009, Japan hosted it’s annual round of the Formula 1 Japanese Grand Prix.  For those of you who have been reading this blog, last year, I also attended the Japanese Grand Prix.  This year was a little different.  After two years at Fuji Speedway in Shizuoka, the Japanese Grand Prix moved back to its traditional home of Suzuka Circuit in Mie Prefecture.  Mie is located south west of Tokyo.  The closest major city is Nagoya, but you can still access Kyoto and Osaka from Suzuka.  By and far, the easiest and most common way to reach the circuit itself is to leave from Nagoya.

The biggest difference between Fuji Speedway and Suzuka Circuit is the owner.  Fuji is ultimately owned by Toyota, while Suzuka is owned by Honda.  The two car giants of Japan competed for the rights to hold the Japanese Grand Prix for the last three years.  From this year, the plan was to alternate between Fuji and Suzuka.  Next year’s race was supposed to be held in Fuji.  Unfortunately, due to the downturn in the economy last year, Fuji decided to not hold the race in 2010, so Suzuka stepped up and will hold the race in Japan for the next few years.  Many of the drivers were very happy about this, but what about the fans and the Japanese people themselves?  While a lot of people don’t really care, race enthusiasts were always happy to hear that Suzuka won the race.  It is one of the very few figure 8 circuits in the world, and the only one on the F1 calendar.  It is steeped in history that, while not as old as Fuji, is more prestigious.

Accessing and retuning home from Suzuka Circuit is very easy.  From Nagoya, it’s a simple reserved express train from Nagoya Station to Suzuka Circuit Inou Station.  You can also purchase reserved tickets to get back to Nagoya.  While this may be a little expensive compared to the regular trains, it guarantees that you’ll have a seat, and when you return to Nagoya, that may be very important.  When you do reach the station, it’s very easy to find your way to the circuit.  Just follow the groups of people and you’ll be fine.  While it may be different in future years, be sure to pick up a map and ask the staff for some information to make sure you know your options.  If you want to play it safe, just return to the same station.  The second option is to take the Kintetsu trains to Shiroko Station.  It’s about 5 kilometres away from the circuit, or an hour walk.  There is a shuttle bus, but it can take up to an hour to wait for it.  Many people enjoy a nice walk in the countryside to get to this station.  To reach it, you must also walk past the Inou.  The main advantage of walking to Shiroko is that trains come more often than at the Inou station.  When leaving Nagoya, don’t worry too much about buying tickets.  You can easily buy them at the main entrance as there will probably be a table set up for selling return tickets.  Just be sure to know which tickets you need before leaving.

When entering Suzuka circuit itself, it’s evident that Honda’s circuit company knows what it’s doing.  It has held the F1 event and other major world sporting events for years.  The F1 event itself is very similar to the one in 2008, but there are noticeable differences.  The first is that the party is slightly bigger, yet more compact.  In Fuji, everything was spread out a lot more.  Suzuka’s main entertainment area was behind the main grandstand, and there wasn’t a lot going on outside of that area.  Of course, you can always buy the basic souvenirs around the course, but there were fewer opportunities to do so.  However, buying food was ten times better in Suzuka.  The options were slightly limited, and it wasn’t the cheapest food in the world, but it was good and reasonable for a world sporting event.  The major plus is the number of activities that are available for children.  There is a large ferris wheel, and other various amusement rides that are centred for children.  Suzuka, being Honda’s signature track, has a better amusement area compared to Motegi.  There are various boat rides, and roller coasters.  There was a go-kart track, but this was closed to add more space for exhibitions.  Overall, I’d prefer Suzuka over Fuji, and most Japanese people would tend to agree.  Fuji’s major advantage was being close to Tokyo.

Looking at the race, it was your typical F1 race.  I had the chance to enjoy the event during qualifying for the first time.  It was a nice event, and qualifying made walking around the main areas easier.  It was extremely busy on race day, so if you can enjoy the Saturday qualifying, be sure to do your shopping then; don’t wait until race day or things will be sold out.  Qualifying was riddled with accidents, and the race itself wasn’t that exciting.  In typical F1 fashion, there were several passes on the first few laps, but after that, it was a war of attrition.  Everyone kept circling the circuit and any passing was done in the pits.  By the end of the day, Sebastian Vettel won the race with home team Toyota’s Jarno Trulli in second.  Bringing up the last spot on the podium was McLaren’s Lewis Hamilton.

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Suzuka Circuit Links:

(English – Note that this site has only information on the facilities) http://www.mobilityland.co.jp/english/
(Japanese – Note that this site has information on events) http://www.suzukacircuit.jp/
(Wiki) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzuka_Circuit
(Official F1 Website) http://www.formula1.com/

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2008 Fuji Television Japanese Grand Prix October 21, 2008

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Sports, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on and read the post complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-39

On October 12th, 2008, Japan hosted the 16th round of the FIA F1 World Championship.  The pinnacle of four wheel motorsports has been coming to Japan for decades.  Since 2007, the Japanese GP has been run at Fuji Speedway in Shizuoka.  Before 2007, the F1 Championship had been going to Suzuka in Mie Prefecture.  A few hours away by Shinkansen.  In 2006, Toyota had more money than Honda, so F1 decided to move from Suzuka to Fuji.

Fuji Speedway is nestled at the base of Mt. Fuji in Shizuoka.  It’s a beautiful circuit that has a 1.5 km straight and various corners.  It has been full of controversy as many drivers dislike the course.  It tends to rain often and it’s difficult to see Mt. Fuji at anytime.  While Fuji Speedway is located very close to Tokyo, it was a nightmare to go and return from the Speedway last year.  It took over 3 hours to just leave the circuit!  I must say that I was worried about the wait to leave the Speedway, however, things ran extremely smoothly.  There was hardly any problems.  Following last year, the organizers decided to try to fix things, and the changes worked.  While I had to walk a long distance to reach my shuttle bus, the lineup was only 5 minutes and I reached Gotenba Station very quickly.  So quickly, that by the time I returned to Tokyo this year, I was still waiting for the shuttle bus, last year!  Needless to say, I was very happy.

I have never been to the Canadian Grand Prix, but as you should know, I have been to Japan’s Moto GP race.  Comparing the two, I still love Moto GP, and the feeling of both events is completely different.  Moto GP attracts more international faces, and more hardcore fans.  F1 brings more of the everyday people.  It’s hard to explain the differences, but just imagine the differences between the downtown core of any city with one of the suburbs.  Moto GP is like a suburb.  Everyone is roughly from the same type of family, whereas F1 brings people from all walks of life.  The amount of good available for purchase at the F1 race was astonishing.  There are more items, but unless you are a true fan, there isn’t too much that is worthwhile.  To the average fan, namely me, I wasn’t going to buy a Ferrari shirt, or a Renault shirt either.  Prices were very expensive and the products were generally useless outside F1.  I don’t know too many people who wear complete F1 race suits (each costs over 500,000 Yen) or even a shirt that is full of Toyota logos.  As nice as some of the clothes and goods were, I just couldn’t buy any of it.  However, that never stopped the thousands of other fans from buying as much as they could.

The race itself was fairly exciting.  Right at the first corner, there was an incident involving the top driver, Lewis Hamilton.  By the end of the 6th lap, things had finally settled down a little.  Like all of F1, passing tends to be infrequent and at the beginning of the race.  After 10 laps of any race, things get boring.  The only excitement occurs when there is a blown engine or an accident in the pits.  Other than that, not much happens.  I must say that Fuji Speedway is better than most tracks on the F1 calender.  Passing occurred during the entire race, although not so often as Moto GP.  😉  In the end, after a very eventful opening to the race, Fernando Alonso, driving a Renault, won the race.  After the cooldown lap, I grabbed my stuff and ran like the wind.  I had to beat the crowd so I could get home somewhat on time.

After the first year of hiccups at the first Fuji Speedway Grand Prix, the second year was 10 times better.  While the price of a ticket is reallye expensive, it’s worth it to go at least once in your life.  Hopefully next year, at Suzuka, there will be more free swag and a more exciting atmosphere.  I’ll let you if I do get tickets to go.

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

2008 A-style Grand Prix of Japan October 6, 2008

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Sports, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “2008 A-style Grand Prix of Japan” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-2G

September 28 marked the 2008 A-style Grand Prix of Japan.  The A-style Grand Prix of Japan is the Japanese round of Moto GP.  Moto GP is the premier league of motorcycle racing, equivalent to F1.  This championship is, in my opinion, much better than F1.  There is a lot of passing, and lots of excitement.  Going to a true Grand Prix, you’ll be entertained with 3 different races and 3 different racers.  There are 3 classes in Moto GP.  125cc, 250cc, and MotoGP Class.  The 125s are the entry level for world class.  Riders can be as young as 15 to a maximum age of 28.  This is to promote younger talent to rise through the classes.  Generally, good riders will start in 125, move to 250, and finally graduate to the MotoGP class.  It is very difficult as each class gets smaller and smaller. Going to a MotoGP race is an adventure in itself.  The race is held in Motegi, Tochigi Prefecture, about 3 hours North of Tokyo.  The track is nestled within the surrounding hills and mountains and it provides a good change in elevation.  However, the track can be a little boring.  Rather than have nice fast sweeping corners that allow motorcycles to pass, it’s a stop and go track that is better suited to F1.   While it isn’t the best track for motorcycles, it is still a great place to go.  I have been to 2 previous Grand Prix of Japan and I must say, this year was the best.  Previously, it took a long time to get to the track and a longer time to get home.  We got to the GP very quickly (almost record time) and returned home after the race in record time.  If you do go, try to get a packaged tour.  You tend to get free stuff and you don’t have to worry about driving when you are tired.

I took the Yamaha fan tour.  I was picked up at the train station, taken to the event, and got free swag when I entered the race area.  Last year’s package was very similar.  This year, I got a cap, T-shirt, scarf, and bag.  The bag was mainly to carry everything.  I also picked up a few other things.  If you ever go to an F1 race, the amount of goods available are greater, but not as nice (I think) as the Moto GP goods.  Unfortunately, the good things were sold very quickly and I couldn’t buy some things.  On the way back, we were greeted with more free things.  We got a free sticker to celebrate Valentino Rossi’s World Championship, and a free photo book highlighting the 2007 Yamaha Motor GP Season.  Unfortunately, it isn’t the year I’d like to have, but the pictures were amazing.  I’d say they didn’t make much of a profit, if any, with the tickets they sold. The Grand Prix of Japan is a very well oiled machine.  Everything runs very smoothly.  All of the vendors stay the same, yet provide new things every year.  Every year, I want to buy more and more things.  I just can’t stop myself.  I’m sure I’ll buy even more next year.  🙂

As for the race, the 125cc race was the most exciting.  The opening lap saw 3 accidents.  Two being in the last corner.  The 250cc race saw only one accident, but the rest was exciting racing.  Lots of lead changes in the beginning and a young Italian won the race.  The Moto GP class was the most exciting.  It was the first chance Valentino Rossi had to win his first championship in 3 years.  The opening of the race saw Australian Casey Stoner take the lead with Rossi falling back.  He always tends to do that.  Later on, he overtook Stoner and eventually won the race.  After the race, I ran down to the track to help celebrate Rossi’s victory and Championship victory.  The closest I could get was about 20 metres.  Needless to say, it was a very exciting and lively time.  The most fun I had in years.  If you are ever in Japan during the Moto GP, please try to go.  The whole event is an experience that shouldn’t be missed.  One small exception.  I’m a big motorcycle racing fan, so I believe I’m extremely biased.  😉

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

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