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Tokyo (Ueno – Corin Street, Tokyo Bike Town) May 11, 2010

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Tokyo (Ueno – Corin Street, Tokyo Bike Town)” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-mT

Ueno is one of the biggest hubs in the east side of Tokyo.  It is known as a transportation hub, home of various museums, Ueno Park, and Ameyokocho.  I have mentioned in previous posts that Tokyo’s major centres are all very similar to each other.  There is very little variance aside from the size.  Ueno is not an exception, but it is still unique in its own right.  The area doesn’t have the same feel as Shinjuku or Ikebukuro.  It is smaller than Shibuya, yet retains the character of a major centre.  The cherry blossom season is probably the best time to visit Ueno, but a visit at any other time is also recommended.

Looking north-east from Ueno station will take you to a fairly unknown area.  It was Bike Town.  Bike Town was an area along the highway, north of the station.  It was hard to find at first, but once you were there, you were greeted with a bike nut’s dream.  The area was dominated by a company called “Corin”.  This company ran several shops that dominated the entire area.  Each shop was slightly different.  One would specialize in Harley Davidson parts, another in old two-stroke racer parts.  Some had scooter parts, but most sold clothes that looked similar to each other.  All of the clothes they sold were either small brands, or their own personal brand.  The quality was good, and everything was fairly unique.  Unfortunately, as of 2008, reported by a blog post, the company has gone out of business.  This is not very surprising.  The entire area never looked like it could support that many shops selling the same items.  It would appear that they were the victims of trying to do too much in such a small area.  In the past, this area was very busy with people selling parts, but in today’s age, it’s not easy as most people can buy parts online.  Tokyo city itself is not a good place to have a full sized motorcycle, as Corin tended to specialize in.  The area has been transformed from being the bike mecca of Tokyo, to nearly being a ghost town.

While the major retailer of the area, Corin, has left, there are still various companies still doing business.  Along the main street, under the highway, there are still several shops that have survived the changing times.  There are a few bike shops selling new and used motorcycles, and there is the Honda Parts shop.  While the Honda Parts shop has “Honda” in its name, and a Honda logo, they are not exclusive to Honda.  They do sell a variety of parts that will fit with most bikes.    There is also “UPC Ride On”, which is mainly an Arai helmet seller, but they do have other gear for sale.  This shop is a personal favourite of mine, and they have various events with a few famous Japanese riders visiting the shop, or signing helmets for them to sell/display.  As with Corin, some of these shops have more than one branch along the main street.  Be sure to check each one as they don’t always carry the same parts, let alone the same goods.  Unfortunately, like Corin, they are starting to carry the same things in each branch, which could be a sign that things are getting worse.

If you are interested in buying a motorcycle, do not try to buy one in this area.  It might seem like a good area as it is called “Bike Town” for a reason.  Unfortunately, it’s mostly a parts and gear town.  For those looking to buy a motorcycle, you are better off visiting one of the major dealers.  The small dealers here do have nice motorcycles, but I myself find it a little scary to buy from them.  They don’t always seem friendly, and you may get a lemon.  I have seen nice bikes in a couple of shops, but one of the shops had nothing but very old bikes just collecting dust.  Besides the seedy bike sellers, if who love motorcycles, this area is still worth a quick visit.  You can still get cheaper helmets and gear from the remaining shops.  Unfortunately, due to the ease of online shopping, I wouldn’t be surprised if many more of these shops closed down.  You can easily buy the same parts for the same, if not cheaper price online.  I would recommend visiting this area soon as I assume that more of the shops might go out of business in the next few years.  I wouldn’t be surprised to see a large department store buy several of the buildings and build a new department store in the area.  Do beware that buying a motorcycle from a small shop in this area can be dangerous.  You are better off going to a big shop that’s outside the city than one of the seedy small ones here.

This is part of my series on Ueno.  Please continue to read more about Ueno at Ueno – Ueno Park and Ueno – Ameyokocho.

Ueno Information:

UPC Ride On (Japanese Only):  http://www.upc.ne.jp/
Corin Information (Blog):  http://www.persimmonous.jp/?p=377
Wikitravel (Ueno):  http://wikitravel.org/en/Tokyo/Ueno
Wikipedia (Ueno):  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ueno,_Tokyo

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

2010 Tokyo Motorcycle Show April 6, 2010

Posted by Dru in Kanto, Sports, Tokyo.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “2010 Tokyo Motorcycle Show” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-oT

From March 26th till the 28th, the 37th Tokyo Motorcycle Show was held at Tokyo Big Site convention centre.  It was my annual pilgrimage to check out the new bikes being offered in Japan.  With the worst recession in years happening in 2009, I wasn’t expecting much out of this year’s motorcycle show.  It is true that the show was noticeably smaller, but it was much better than I could have expected.  All of the major motorcycle manufacturers were there, including all of the big name foreign companies.  It was a very important marketing campaign for most companies as the riding season has pretty much begun in Tokyo.

The motorcycle show has occupied the same two halls at Tokyo Big Site since I came to Japan.  They take over the lower floors of the West Hall, an outdoor parking lot, and the roof of the West Hall.  It may not be the biggest motorcycle show in the world, but it is a very interesting one.  The show itself is centred in West Hall 1 and 2, which form a U shape around the atrium.  Upon entering the ticketed area, you are funnelled into West Hall 2 where you are immediately greeted by motorcycles.  Generally, the manufacturers line the outer wall of both halls, while parts and accessory companies take the middle.  Lining the inner wall are the local companies that sell things such as T-shirts, insurance, and magazine subscriptions.  You will almost always find people on the outer wall, rather than the inner wall.  For this year’s show, Hall 2 was dominated by foreign manufacturers, and Hall 1 was more domestic.

There are many things to do, other than just look at bikes while at the motorcycle show.  Most manufacturers hand out surveys, in Japanese only, where you put your name, address, and what you liked about their booth.  In return, you can get some free things, such as a catalogue.  It may not seem like much, but in good years, you can get pins and file holders.  Sometimes you spend the time to fill out a form only to discover you got something you didn’t want.  If you can’t read Japanese, you are better off not trying as they will send you junk mail if you don’t tick, or leave empty in some cases, the correct box.  The only downside to this aspect of the show is that people just mill about within the showcase making it difficult to take pictures and look at the bikes.  At the Tokyo Motorcycle Show, you can also test ride many of the new bikes.  Behind the halls, there is a parking lot where they do test rides of various motorcycles.  They even have starter lessons on scooters.  This year, they added a used bike display where you could actually purchase a used motorcycle.  I generally don’t go outside as I usually don’t have the time or patience to wait for a motorcycle to ride.  If you are like me, and finish the show within half a day, you can spend a lot more time following the scary men who take pictures of all the bike girls.  It’s a phenomenon that follows every motor show in Japan.  If there are nice cars, there will be nice women dressed in next to nothing, helping to display the bikes.  It can be difficult to see the bikes when they are “on display”, but if you are finished with the show, it can be interesting.

This year’s show, as I mentioned, was better than I expected.  All of the major manufacturers were there.  There were some very interesting new bikes.  The Japanese manufacturers weren’t very interesting, but they did provide a few new variants of their base bikes.  Yamaha finally unveiled their Super Tenere bike that was created for the Dakar Rally.  It wasn’t as cool as the concept version, but it did look ready for the Dakar.  It still had the “first edition” stickers all over it enticing more people to pay for it.  The best concept was by Moto Guzzi.  They produced the V12 LM which was, albeit impractical, a very interesting bike.  The tail was shaped like a bird, and they included bird cut outs on the tires.  Unfortunately, they forgot to put a nice headlight on the front, but that’s just my opinion.  There were several other cool race versions from other manufacturers, and there were the obligatory MotoGP bikes that were on hand.  Yoshimura had their typical display with the same standard Suzuka 8 Hours Superbike.

While the main focus of the show is on the bikes, there are displays showcasing the various circuits of Japan.  Generally, Ebisu, Tsukuba, and Motegi are represented by booths.  The others can be found in pamphlets given out at other various booths.  If you are into custom motorcycles, there is always a custom bike show, usually in the Atrium.  The police are also on hand to show off their riding skills, which are excellent, and to promote safety when riding.  If you are in need of help, JAF (Japan Auto Federation) provides demonstrations on how they can pick up your bike if it won’t start.  If you are a bike nut, and you are in town during the Tokyo Motorcycle Show, this is a must do on the list.  It’s easy to visit in the morning, and still have time to look around Odaiba in the afternoon.  Hope you can make it next year.

Information:

Tokyo Motorcycle Show (English):  http://www.motorcycleshow.org/english/index.shtml
Tokyo Motorcycle Show (Japanese:  http://www.motorcycleshow.org/index.html
Tokyo Big Site (English):  http://www.bigsight.jp/english/index.html
Tokyo Big Site (Japanese):  http://www.bigsight.jp/index.html

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

2009 Tokyo Motor Show November 3, 2009

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “2009 Tokyo Motor Show” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-ij

The 2009 Tokyo Motor Show is being held from October 29 until November 4 at Makuhari Messe in Chiba.  As of posting this, there are only a few days left until the end.  This year, due to the economic downturn that started in 2008, the show was left in limbo up until this past summer.  There are less than half of the exhibitors in this year’s show compared to the last show in 2007.  In 2007, there were over 240 exhibitors, and this year it’s just over 100.  This is a significant decrease, and it shows.  The event space is more open, and reduced.  There are no longer any outdoor exhibits, and they only make use of the convention centre’s main hall.  The North Hall and central Exhibition Hall are no longer used.  The outdoor element in the central plaza is also discontinued for this year.  It’s a bit of a shame that there are only two foreign car makers present at this show, but it was still a great show to visit.

The first thing to do when heading to the show is to actually head to the show.  Makuhari Messe is a huge convention centre, and without the North Hall being open, it’s a bit of a walk to the main entrance.  From there, there are three major halls to visit: the East, Central, and West halls.  Each one has its own group of manufacturers.  This year, the West Hall was occupied by Honda, motorcycle manufacturers, and various other parts companies.  The Central Hall had Toyota, Subaru, Mazda, and a special Car of the Year Japan exhibition.  In the East, Nissan and Mitsubishi had large displays while the Gran Tourismo and Tomica moved into the main hall from a side hall two years ago.  The amount of space needed was dramatically cut down, but there was always a lot to see.

With the European and American companies opting to not go to the show, the Japanese companies made up for it with their concept cars.  The theme was the environment.  It was great to see so many hybrids and electric vehicles.  They even displayed various walking machines similar to the Segway, but seated versions.  All of the cars were busy with photographers taking as many pictures as they could.  Toyota and Honda were one of the busiest exhibitions.  There were also several “race queens” at each booth modeling all of the cars.  While the size of the show was reduced, the number of girls showing the vehicles was the same, proportionately.  Interestingly enough, each maker seemed to choose their women based on their overall theme or target audience.  Some chose women in their 30s, and some chose women in their 20s.  Some had more elegant clothing, while others made their girls look trashy.  Image is everything, and as long as it fit, anything would go.

Unfortunately, this year was a bit small.  Many people say the Japanese show is no longer an “international” show.  While I agree that it isn’t as grand as before, it’s also a tough year.  With other cities being more important, it’s natural to think that the Shanghai show will be bigger.  Will it always be bigger?  I’m guessing that in the future, the Tokyo Motor Show will increase again as the auto makers make more money and have the ability to display their cars at more shows.  It’s a little expensive, but if they want to keep their business in Japan, they’ll have to keep at least a small presence at these shows.

Tokyo Motor Show Information:

Official Site:  http://www.tokyo-motorshow.com/en/index.html
Official Site (Japanese): http://www.tokyo-motorshow.com/index.html

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

The Great Motorcycle Adventure – Part II (Wrap Up) September 1, 2009

Posted by Dru in Japan, Shikoku, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “The Great Motorcycle Adventure – Part II (Wrap Up)” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-eP

By now, you have finished reading about Shikoku and you know what to expect if you visit Shikoku.  In this post, I’m going to be a little greedy and talk about my adventure, personally.

Preparing for this adventure was a chore in itself.  There are a million things to do, and a million things to plan.  I purposefully left everything till the last few weeks, but kept a basic plan in my head.  I never even had a good idea of how long I’d like to stay in each area until a week before leaving.  In fact, I never even locked my plans on how to get to Shikoku until the last second, literally.  I decided to take the ferry, roughly two nights before I left, and didn’t even reserve a spot until the day I left.  There are two main reasons why I chose to take the ferry.  The first, I didn’t feel like riding for 8 hours on the expressway, getting lost, looking for gas, and generally being bored on my own.  The main reason I took the ferry was that a friend of mine was also heading to Shikoku at the same time.  Instead of driving, or riding a motorcycle, he and a friend of his decided to ride their bicycles from Kochi to Matsuyama.  It was also a great adventure, and I felt honoured to be starting our journey together.  In fact, we almost didn’t even start together.  They barely made it onto the ferry as they were late arriving at the terminal.  On the ferry, I also met a German man who was on a trip to Kyushu.  It takes roughly two days to reach Kyushu, but we had a great time drinking, eating, and talking.  I believe I made the right decision.

My friend, John, has his own podcast.  You can view it here:  http://weblish.net/
Please subscribe to his main Weblish Podcast (Episode 40 a~f) to see his own documentary of his trip in Shikoku.

Upon riding down the ramp at Tokushima, I had to wait roughly 20 minutes for my friend to arrive.  He had to get gas, and he also got lost looking for the terminal.  I was getting antsy to get out as it was a beautiful day and I was hoping to head up to Naruto for the whirlpools.  As we were looking for the hotel, we had a little accident.  My friend dropped his motorcycle.  This was our only bad luck, in terms of riding.  It took us about 30 minutes to find the hotel, but when we did, we were just happy to be in Shikoku.  My friend, however, had no energy and needed to get off the bike for the day.  This would actually be the mood of the entire trip.  Ride a little, and then relax for the afternoon and night.  We toured Tokushima before going to bed.  The hotel was great, and I wish I could have gone back.  The owner had a big Ducati in the garage, free motorcycle parking, and free wifi in our room.  What more could we ask for?  He even gave us a little advice when we left for our trip.  Unfortunately, when we returned to Tokushima, the hotel was fully booked.

Riding down route 55 was excellent.  It was our first full day, and like any other adventure, we got lost.  The first time we got lost was when the road just stopped.  They were still building a bypass.  Thankfully, we needed the break anyways and it was relatively easy to get back on route.  We got to see pretty much everything I wanted to see, in terms of sights.  We saw a dam, the beach, and the cape.  It was a beautiful road and I wish I could go back again, someday.  I’m not finished with Muroto.  I only wish I had an extra 10 hours to enjoy some of the sights that we passed, especially the beaches.

Kochi was our first rest day.  Since we don’t ride much, it was a good opportunity to keep our batteries full.  We had a great time walking around and seeing all of the people.  My only regret is not bringing flip flops to walk around in.  It was only the third day and my feet were already starting to hurt from walking in motorcycle boots.  This was also the day that we decided to not use our motorcycles aside from getting from A to B, as we didn’t want to look for parking, and risk getting lost.  It is way too easy to get lost, especially without a navigation system.  We did have a map, but it was for the entire region, so it wasn’t detailed enough for us, wherever we went.  If I lived in the area, I would definitely want to explore the area a lot more.

Our next leg of the trip took us from Kochi to Ozu.  We had a tough time finding a hotel as we were in the middle of Golden Week.  We were lucky to find a room in a town we wanted to stay in.  We thought about taking route 56 all the way to the second cape, but thought we had better skip it as we took too much time taking route 55.  We also started our adventure on the expressway for the first time.  I can’t tell you how much time you can save if you take the expressway.  People go much faster, and there are very few cars.  It’s expensive overall, but well worth it, even for short distances.  We cut through the middle of the cape to reach Uwajima.  We had several plans for the day as we didn’t know how long it would take us to reach Ozu.  We decided that taking a junction to Uwajima, first, and then heading north to Ozu would be better as we had a lot of time.  We got lost in Uwajima, but that was to be expected.  We were more lost when we were in Ozu.  We saw a beautiful European style castle or palace on the side of the mountain, but we didn’t have time to go looking for it.  We both thoroughly enjoyed Ozu.  It was the kind of small town Japan that you can only dream of.  It wasn’t very small, but small enough that you can walk everywhere.  The town had a train running through every hour or so, the shops closed very early, and there really wasn’t a lot to do except enjoy the scenery.  It was extremely peaceful.

Our final touring leg was to head out to Misaki and then head to Matsuyama.  This was probably the biggest disappointment of the trip for me.  Misaki turned out to be nothing special.  It was a nice challenge, but the area wasn’t that beautiful.  It could have been all the clouds, but I’m not too sure.  I enjoyed the coast from Ozu to Matsuyama, and loved the beach at Futami.  I hope to return someday and just spend a few hours relaxing.  We spent a little too much time there, and we were very anxious about Matsuyama.  Being the height of Golden Week, we had no place to stay, and we might have to find an internet café or something.  Thankfully, we found the Matsuyama Guest House, with an excellent host.  We met many great people and had the time of our lives.  I can’t say how greatful I was for staying there.  My only problem was the two men we shared a room with.  They were Americans who were hiking along the 88 temple route.  Matsuyama was their last stop before returning to Tokyo for work.  I can’t describe the stench that they and their clothes produced, but needless to say, I didn’t sleep well.  I got up early the next morning and went for a walk on my own to collect my thoughts.  It was about the time that my friend and I were starting to feel a strain on our relationship.  There is only so much two people can do together before they start to get upset at each other.  They can be the best friends in the world, but unless you live with them for a long time, it can be difficult.  Matsuyama itself was a great place, but not a place that I would want to visit again.  I came, I saw, I left.  I wish I went to the Dogo Onsen, and I would love to visit the Dogo Brewery again, but in reality, there isn’t much for me to see or do anymore.

After Matsuyama, we had to decide whether to risk heading to Takamatsu, with a chance of showers, or stay another day in Matsuyama.  We decided to risk it as the chances were low.  We weren’t so lucky this day.  We had a small shower on the expressway, and another one when we got in to Takamatsu city itself.  It took us a little while to find our way to the hotel, but overall, everything was fine.  We had a free computer in the hotel, and they even covered our bikes so it wouldn’t get too dirty from the rain.  The hotel was run by an older couple, like a family business, but it was part of a small franchise.  We were thinking of heading to Kotohira before getting to Takamatsu, but we changed our plans when we saw the weather forecast for the day, and also when we thought about parking.  We also made our first big mistake of the day.  We tried to take a train, but misread the timetable.  Instead of having an extra train on holidays, it said there was NO train on the holidays.  We had to wait at the station for over one hour.  We could have walked back, but in our motorcycle boots, probably not.  We also didn’t know about bicycle rentals, which would have helped us a lot, but that’s for our next trip.

We used Takamatsu as our base for three nights.  We spent a day in Kotohira and a day in Naoshima.  There isn’t much to say or add as my previous posts describe it much better.  My only regret was that it was raining so much in Naoshima that I didn’t get a chance to ride a bicycle on the island.  I will definitely have to return for that adventure.  At the time, I didn’t know about an island called Shodoshima.  It is another famous island that is close to Naoshima.  It is famous for being the olive capital of Japan, and known for a replica 88 temple pilgrimage.  Thankfully, I can also reach this island from Okayama, which is a place I’m considering to visit.  Okayama is famous for its black castle.  It was built to rival Himeji castle.  It would make a nice long weekend trip, if I get a chance.  If I do return to Takamatsu I will definitely have to enjoy the delicious Udon, but for now, I’ll be content with the udon in Tokyo.  Takamatsu is no longer on my list of places to visit.

Upon returning to Tokushima, I finally got to see one of the main things I wanted to see since I started planning my trip.  The Naruto Whirlpools are famous in Japan and I had to see them.  I was a little sad that we didn’t see them when we arrived, but I was still very happy to see them at the end of the trip.  By this time, my friend and I had nothing to really talk about, and we were basically trying to plan the end.  He ended up leaving a day early so he could be with his girlfriend and also go to a food festival in Osaka that was held once every four years, or something like that.  I couldn’t blame him at all.  I would have done the same.  My only problem was that the ferry I wanted to take was fully booked and I didn’t know if I could go home the next day or not.  The day that he left Shikoku, I had a full day to myself and my thoughts in Tokushima.  The city itself is very boring unless you get out.  I didn’t want to do that as I was tired from the travelling and really wanted to go home.  I ended up just walking back and forth in town until my feet gave up.  I had to change hotels as well because the one I stayed in was fully booked that night.  Needless to say, I had a restless night.

The morning of my potential departure from Shikoku was an early one.  I arrived at the ferry terminal very early, about 1 hour before they even opened.  I was the only idiot there that early.  I got my ticket to wait and didn’t even know if I could get on or not.  About one hour before we could board, one of the staff said I had a place, but I couldn’t understand him well enough.  Thankfully, I met a very nice old man, who reminded me of Mr. Miyagi from the Karate Kid (“Best Kid” in Japan).  He was kind enough to help me, just a little.  We did have a nice conversation before boarding the ferry.  The ferry ride home was the same as when I went to Shikoku.  The only difference was that I had my own bunk, and there wasn’t a “restaurant”.  Instead, they only had vending machine food.  It was still good enough.  I ate and drank all day and night until it was time to sleep.  I can’t tell you how different it was to sleep in a bunk versus the floor of a tatami room.  The only problem was that the curtains of the bunk kept all the air in, and I woke up suffocating in my own carbon dioxide.  Arriving in Tokyo, I was greeted by the fresh morning air; it was about 6 am.  I had a nice short ride home where I put my things away and could finally say “tadaima” (I’m home).

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

2008 A-style Grand Prix of Japan October 6, 2008

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Sports, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “2008 A-style Grand Prix of Japan” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-2G

September 28 marked the 2008 A-style Grand Prix of Japan.  The A-style Grand Prix of Japan is the Japanese round of Moto GP.  Moto GP is the premier league of motorcycle racing, equivalent to F1.  This championship is, in my opinion, much better than F1.  There is a lot of passing, and lots of excitement.  Going to a true Grand Prix, you’ll be entertained with 3 different races and 3 different racers.  There are 3 classes in Moto GP.  125cc, 250cc, and MotoGP Class.  The 125s are the entry level for world class.  Riders can be as young as 15 to a maximum age of 28.  This is to promote younger talent to rise through the classes.  Generally, good riders will start in 125, move to 250, and finally graduate to the MotoGP class.  It is very difficult as each class gets smaller and smaller. Going to a MotoGP race is an adventure in itself.  The race is held in Motegi, Tochigi Prefecture, about 3 hours North of Tokyo.  The track is nestled within the surrounding hills and mountains and it provides a good change in elevation.  However, the track can be a little boring.  Rather than have nice fast sweeping corners that allow motorcycles to pass, it’s a stop and go track that is better suited to F1.   While it isn’t the best track for motorcycles, it is still a great place to go.  I have been to 2 previous Grand Prix of Japan and I must say, this year was the best.  Previously, it took a long time to get to the track and a longer time to get home.  We got to the GP very quickly (almost record time) and returned home after the race in record time.  If you do go, try to get a packaged tour.  You tend to get free stuff and you don’t have to worry about driving when you are tired.

I took the Yamaha fan tour.  I was picked up at the train station, taken to the event, and got free swag when I entered the race area.  Last year’s package was very similar.  This year, I got a cap, T-shirt, scarf, and bag.  The bag was mainly to carry everything.  I also picked up a few other things.  If you ever go to an F1 race, the amount of goods available are greater, but not as nice (I think) as the Moto GP goods.  Unfortunately, the good things were sold very quickly and I couldn’t buy some things.  On the way back, we were greeted with more free things.  We got a free sticker to celebrate Valentino Rossi’s World Championship, and a free photo book highlighting the 2007 Yamaha Motor GP Season.  Unfortunately, it isn’t the year I’d like to have, but the pictures were amazing.  I’d say they didn’t make much of a profit, if any, with the tickets they sold. The Grand Prix of Japan is a very well oiled machine.  Everything runs very smoothly.  All of the vendors stay the same, yet provide new things every year.  Every year, I want to buy more and more things.  I just can’t stop myself.  I’m sure I’ll buy even more next year.  🙂

As for the race, the 125cc race was the most exciting.  The opening lap saw 3 accidents.  Two being in the last corner.  The 250cc race saw only one accident, but the rest was exciting racing.  Lots of lead changes in the beginning and a young Italian won the race.  The Moto GP class was the most exciting.  It was the first chance Valentino Rossi had to win his first championship in 3 years.  The opening of the race saw Australian Casey Stoner take the lead with Rossi falling back.  He always tends to do that.  Later on, he overtook Stoner and eventually won the race.  After the race, I ran down to the track to help celebrate Rossi’s victory and Championship victory.  The closest I could get was about 20 metres.  Needless to say, it was a very exciting and lively time.  The most fun I had in years.  If you are ever in Japan during the Moto GP, please try to go.  The whole event is an experience that shouldn’t be missed.  One small exception.  I’m a big motorcycle racing fan, so I believe I’m extremely biased.  😉

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

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