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Happy Holidays 2011 December 6, 2011

Posted by Dru in Tokyo.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Happy Holidays 2011” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-L9

It is another year and another Christmas.  As I get older, I notice that times goes faster and faster.  I can’t believe it has been a year since I last wrote this holiday post.  It is nearly a tradition to talk about the Christmas season now.  Unfortunately there is nothing left to talk about for Tokyo’s Christmas.  In my previous posts, see links below, I have mentioned the tradition of Christmas in Japan.  In reality, nothing has changed over the years.  Things are still going strong and people just party like it’s 1999.  It is a little difficult to find new things and I’m sure I’ll discover something, but generally speaking there are no new unique developments in Japan.

The most popular thing to do these days is to go around Tokyo and look at the various Christmas light displays.  There are several places that are now traditional places to visit.  Omotesando is one of the first places one should visit.  It is often credited as the place where Christmas Illuminations regained popularity in Tokyo around early the 2000s.  After they lit up the main street from Harajuku Station to Omotesando Station, lots of people flocked to Omotesando to enjoy the lights as well as do a lot of shopping. Most areas now do the same thing and it is almost a competition to see who can attract more people.  Unfortunately most of the displays haven’t changed much since they were first introduced.  The signs change and any lighting that is associated with a specific year has changed but the actual displays are generally the same.  It is a bit of a shame that they don’t become more creative but that is how things are in Tokyo.  People have an idea, make it possible then reuse it until it becomes stale.  Rather than revamping things so it stays fresh, they recycle things too often.  Thankfully some areas do change things up.  Christmas trees tend to be different each year and most weak displays are added upon each year until they become grand displays.  Some areas do change slightly each year but as mentioned the basic designs don’t change.

Other areas of mention are Shinjuku, Shiodome, Marunouchi, Roppongi, Korakuen, and Odaiba.  Most of the displays in these areas are very similar to previous years and the locations are the same.  It is possible that some of them will change but I haven’t heard anything about new displays this year.  Some areas are somewhat new but they tend to be on the small side in their first year.  Smaller areas of Tokyo will see light displays and they do tend to grow a bit each year.  Smaller areas don’t have the money to build a large display in one year so it takes a few years to build it up.  No matter where you go in Tokyo, you are sure to see Christmas decorations and lighting.  It can feel a bit commercial but it does put one into the Christmas mood.  Unfortunately, due to the greater importance of New Year’s decorations, after the shops close on Christmas day, the decorations are quickly removed and replaced with the New Year’s displays overnight.  It can feel a bit depressing at first but the thought of an exciting new year is wonderful.

Merry Christmas everyone and I hope you all have a safe and happy holidays wherever you are.  For those who aren’t Christian, Christmas is barely a religious holiday anymore so I hope you can still enjoy it.  (^^)

Happy Holidays 2011 is part of a series of posts each year talking about the year end holiday season in Japan.  To read more, please venture to the other posts below:

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Tokyo – Naka-dori (Marunouchi) February 15, 2011

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Tokyo – Naka-dori (Marunouchi)” complete with photos.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-Cf

Naka-dori is a single street that stretches from Otemachi/Tokyo Station to Hibiya. It is a relatively unknown street in Tokyo and a great gem. If you have read my post about the Marunouchi area, you will know that is lined with various pieces of art. If you have read my post about Christmas lights in Tokyo, you will know that the street is lined with Christmas lights every year. This street has seen a huge revival in recent years due to the completion of several tall sky scrapers. For those who wish to enjoy a short afternoon or those who have been to Tokyo before but only visited the Imperial palace, this is a nice street to take a stroll.

Starting from Otemachi Station itself, finding Naka-dori can be a little challenge. The street starts between the exits of B1 and C14 of Otemachi Station. From there, it’s extremely easy to navigate as you are already on Naka-dori. This area of Naka-dori isn’t very interesting as they are still doing a few renovations but you can already see some of the changes that have occurred. One of the first things you will notice is that the entire street is lined with trees. This is a rarity in Japan, especially Tokyo. The trees may not be that big, yet, but they will continue to grow each and every year.

Most of the action starts next to the Marunouchi Building. From here, you can get a better feel for the street itself. The street feels more alike a European street than a Japanese street, yet it’s in the middle of a big city. The street is all brick lined, and as mentioned, also lined with trees. There are lots of various planted gardens along the street as well to give the entire area life.  This is a large change from the typical drab and lifeless streets of most areas in Tokyo. The biggest attraction along Naka-dori has to be the free art. If you have seen my post on the Hakone Open Air Museum, or if you yourself have been there, this is an area where you can see something similar. From the Marunouchi Building all the way to the Marunouchi Police Station, you will see various works of art lining the street. Some are new, some are old. Most of the art is actually on loan from the Hakone Open Air Museum.  This is probably due to the fact that the owner of almost every building in the area happens to also be the owner of the Hakone Open Air Museum. It’s a wonderful collection that will make you wonder what the artist meant, and some will also make you wonder if it is actual art. Needless to say, it’s something that can be enjoyed.

Naka-dori ends when you reach the Peninsula Hotel. While you can go a little farther, the atmosphere actually changes. After you pass the Peninsula Hotel, you will come to a plaza with a small statue of Godzilla. It’s a nice secret within Tokyo that is a must for anyone who wanted to meet Godzilla himself. The plaza is also a nice place to visit to see various hand prints and signatures of various famous people. The majority of the plaques are of Japanese people, but there are famous western actors and actresses as well. It’s similar to the Grauman’s Chinese Theatre in Hollywood where you can see the hand and feet imprints of various famous people. The only difference is that these are inverted. They are actually coming out of the floor. If you head a little further south, you will come to the end of the interesting area when you hit the Imperial Hotel. This is a famous Tokyo hotel that is the official hotel for royalty. While most royalty and heads of state will stay in Akasaka in the official guest residence, others will stay here. Next to the hotel is the famous Takarazuka theatre. This is an all female theatre troupe where all roles are acted by women. It is very famous amongst women in Japan and they are well known throughout Japan. You can often see hundreds of people lining the street waiting for the famous actresses to come out and wave to the crowd. It can be a little daunting to walk through but it provides an interesting scene to see.

Naka-dori is one of the best secret gems of Tokyo. While you may not see the “traditional” side of Japan, you will definitely enjoy the slow big city life. It’s a unique area that can’t be replicated. Ginza may be the posh shopping area for the wealthy, and Daikanyama is the posh area for the hipsters, but Naka-dori is the place for the office workers to run along and for tourists to stroll.

Naka-dori Information:

Naka-dori Official Site (Japanese): http://www.marunouchi.com/nakadori/

Takarazuka Revue Official Site (Japanese): http://kageki.hankyu.co.jp/
Takarazuka Revue (Wikipedia): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Takarazuka_Revue

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

Tokyo (Ginza – Part II) March 24, 2009

Posted by Dru in Japan, Kanto, Tokyo, Travel.
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Author’s Note:  Dru’s Misadventures has moved to HinoMaple.  Please venture on over there to read “Tokyo (Ginza – Part II)” complete with pictures.  http://wp.me/p2liAm-8a

Exploring the North-East section of Ginza is probably the better area in terms of shopping for high end goods, but for reasonably price goods, the South-West area is better.  The South area is filled with reasonably priced bars and restaurants, but they may not always be friendly to foreigners.  To experience the standing bar experience, many foreign people go to the 300 bar.  It’s a nice place, but very smoky and a minimum 2 drink buy.  I tend to avoid it, but when friends really want to go, I don’t always have a choice.  This area also has a few karaoke bars to have a little fun.  On Chuo-dori, you can head to Matsuzakaya which is a department store that caters to older women.  You will also run into Zara and the first H&M store in Japan.  You can also check out the “Lion” pub.  They have two locations on this side of Chuo-dori.  It’s a nice place that gives you a “European” feel, but to be honest, it isn’t worth it on a holiday, but if you want to go, it’s very popular for Japanese people.

The West area continues to Ginza tradition of expensive shops.  You will find many good, but expensive restaurants in this area.  Along Chuo-dori, the most notable shop is Uniqlo.  It’s a famous Japanese brand that promotes a simple, no brand style.  The clothes are very cheap and generally of good quality.  This shop also has a few Ginza exclusives to attract more people into the shop.  There are also a few specialty shops selling traditional Japanese items.  Along Harumi-dori, you will see Giorgio Armani and the Sony Building.  The Sony Building is very popular for tourists.  You will be able to see the latest gadgets that Sony has to offer.  They do sell most of the products and a few overseas models, but it’s just a fun place to play with all the cool toys.  Sometimes they even offer special exhibitions for art.  The basement has various goods within Plaza.  Plaza is Sony’s own convenience store that sells many foreign goods.  If you are also looking for cheap food in Ginza, going across the street to the Mosaic building, you’ll find reasonably price restaurants in the basement.

While Ginza is a wonderful place to look and shop, due to the price of the products, it’s more of a tourist area and for people with money.  If you continue south-west, you’ll reach Shinbashi, which has many cheap places to eat and drink.  Going north, you’ll reach Yurakucho, which offers cheaper shopping and a few electronic shops.  Due to the increase of tourists in the area, I am noticing less people heading to Ginza for shopping, but if you are out to see people, it’s a great way to see the stylish side of Tokyo.

このblogは英語のblog。もし私の英語は難しい、日本語のquestionは大丈夫。

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